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1. Survival Skills for Self-Managing Your Digestive Condition.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2003.

Audience code (AC): PATIENT (400).

Author (AU): Bonci, L.

Source (SO): In: Bonci, L. American Dietetic Association Guide to Better Digestion. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley and Sons, Inc. 2003. p. 13-26.

Availability (AV): Available from John Wiley and Sons, Inc. Customer Care Department, One Wiley Drive, Somerset, NJ 08875. (800) 762-2974 or (317) 572-3993. Fax (317) 572-4002. Website: www.wiley.com. PRICE: $14.95 plus shipping and handling. ISBN: 0471442232.

Abstract (AB): Coping with a gastrointestinal disorder, whether it is irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), gas (flatulence), constipation, heartburn, or another condition, can be embarrassing and debilitating. While medical treatments and prescriptions can offer relief, one of the most important ways patients can help themselves is in their dietary choices. This chapter on survival skills is from a book that describes how patients can self-manage their digestive disorders through dietary choices. In this chapter, the author outlines four good ‘gut survival skills’ : appropriate food choices, eating behaviors, lifestyle activities, and stress management. The author reviews the food guide pyramid, coping with unusual situations, how to help children to make good food choices, and the role of exercise. The author focuses on the importance of making one’s own health situation a high priority in the demands of daily life.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Digestion. Food Habits. Diet Therapy. Self Care. Patient Education. Symptoms.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Nutrition. Stress. Relaxation Methods. Exercise. Behavior Modification. Food.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200307.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 09461.

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2. Bellyaches in Children.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): FACTSHEET (22).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2002.

Audience code (AC): PATIENT (400).

Author (AU): Hyman, P.

Source (SO): Milwaukee, WI: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD). 2002. [4 p.].

Availability (AV): Available from International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD). P.O. Box 170864, Milwaukee, WI 53217-8076. (888) 964-2001 or (414) 964-1799. E-mail: iffgd@iffgd.org. Website: www.iffgd.org. PRICE: $1.00 for nonmembers; single copy free to members.

Abstract (AB): This fact sheet helps parents understand the various causes for abdominal pain (belly aches) in children and know when to consult with a health care provider for a child’s abdominal pain. The fact sheet begins with clues that can help decide if the bellyache is a medical problem: intensity, duration, chronicity, position, the number of symptoms, and loss of function. Most chronic bellyaches are functional, meaning that the pain is real, but it is not due to any disease (the pain is due to an altered way in which the body is working, not due to a disease characterized by tissue damage, inflammation, or a structural abnormality). The fact sheet also outline the diagnostic criteria for pediatric functional disorders associated with bellyaches: functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome, functional abdominal pain syndrome, abdominal migraine, aerophagia (swallowing air), and functional fecal retention. The fact sheet concludes with the answers to some common questions about bellyaches in children, including pain management, drug therapy, and the role of dietary fiber. The fact sheet includes the contact information for the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD, www.iffgd.org).

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Abdominal Pain. Symptoms. Diagnosis. Infants. Children.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Complications. Diagnosis. Diagnostic Tests. Behavior. Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Pain. Drug Therapy. Dietary Fiber. Chronic Disease. Etiology. Parent Education.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200207.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD DC 08919.

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3. Increasing Our Understanding: New Diagnostic Criteria for Pediatric Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): FACTSHEET (22).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2002.

Audience code (AC): PATIENT (400).

Author (AU): Hyman, P.E.

Source (SO): Milwaukee, WI: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD). 2002. [2 p.].

Availability (AV): Available from International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD). P.O. Box 170864, Milwaukee, WI 53217-8076. (888) 964-2001 or (414) 964-1799. E-mail: iffgd@iffgd.org. Website: www.iffgd.org. PRICE: $1.00 for nonmembers; single copy free to members.

Abstract (AB): Childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders include a variable combination of often age-dependent chronic or recurrent symptoms that are not explained by anatomic, biochemical, or psychiatric abnormality (disease). Like shivering when leaving a swimming pool, or a runner’s leg cramp, the symptoms are real, but are not due to disease. This fact sheet helps parents understand the diagnostic criteria for pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders. The fact sheet describes the biopsychosocial approach to symptoms, which was introduced in the 1970s. This approach believes that symptoms arise from the simultaneous interaction of complex systems including cells, tissues, organs, as well as interpersonal and social environments. The biopsychosocial clinician focuses on alleviating suffering and returning the patient to function; including, but not limited to, the approach of finding and fixing disease. The fact sheet describes the pediatric Rome Criteria used for the classification and diagnosis of functional disorders such as chronic intestinal Pseudoobstruction and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The fact sheet also describes continuing work on the validation of these criteria and in research areas including better care for children, childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders, and on how childhood disorders may affect the development of adult functional gastrointestinal disorders. One chart lists 13 pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders. The fact sheet includes the contact information for the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD, www.iffgd.org). 1 figure.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Symptoms. Diagnosis. Children. Functional Colonic Disorders. Gastrointestinal System. Classification. Etiology.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Complications. Diagnostic Tests. Behavior. Parent Education. Chronic Disease. Patient Selection. Patient Care Management. Child Development.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200207.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD DC 08924.

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4. Antidepressants for Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): FACTSHEET (22).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2002.

Audience code (AC): PATIENT (400). HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Clouse, R.E.

Source (SO): Canal Winchester, OH: Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Association, USA/Canada. 2002. [3 p].

Availability (AV): Available from Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome Association, USA/Canada. 3585 Cedar Hill Road, NW, Canal Winchester, OH 43110. (614) 837-2586. Fax (614) 837-2586. E-mail: waitesd@cvaonline.org. Website: www.cvsaonline.org. PRICE: Single copy free.

Abstract (AB): This newsletter article discusses the use of antidepressants in the treatment of cyclic vomiting in mitochondrial disease. Cyclic vomiting refers to discrete and severe episodes of vomiting, nausea, and lethargy (severe tiredness). Episodes are discrete in that the sufferer is free of nausea and vomiting between episodes. Episodes can occur on a routine schedule, be triggered by physical or psychological stress, or appear to come at random. Cyclic vomiting has many known causes, including intestinal blockage, brain disorders, kidney disease, and several different metabolic disorders. Many of these causes are treatable, so a careful diagnostic work up is important. However, in the vast majority of cases, none of the above causes can be found, and these individuals are given the diagnosis of cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS). Antidepressants are particularly useful in controlling functional symptoms in conditions including irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, and fibromyalgia. Benefits on the physical symptoms can be independent of the drugs’ psychiatric effects. The tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), such as amitriptyline, nortriptyline, or desipramine, appear particularly useful, even in low daily dosages that would be considered subtherapeutic from the psychiatric standpoint. No single TCA has surfaced as superior to the other for CVS, although amitriptyline is most often utilized. The author offers guidelines for administration and dosage, patient selection, and coping with side effects of these drugs. 1 figure. 9 references.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Vomiting. Children. Etiology. Chronic Disease. Acute Disease. Recurrence. Patient Care Management. Drug Therapy. Antidepressants.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Risk Factors. Diagnostic Tests. Patient Selection. Administration and Dosage. Drug Effects. Abdominal Pain. Nausea. Fatigue. Symptoms.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200207.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD DC 08952.

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5. Role of Sexual or Physical Abuse in IBS.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2002.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Koloski, N.A.; Talley, N.J.

Source (SO): In: Camilleri, M. and Spiller, R.C., eds. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Diagnosis and Treatment. Orlando, FL: W.B. Saunders Company. 2002. p. 37-43.

Availability (AV): Available from W.B. Saunders Company. Periodicals Department, 6277 Sea Harbor Drive, Orlando, FL 32887-4800. (800) 654-2452 or (407) 345-4000. Website: www.elsevierhealth.com. PRICE: $75.00. ISBN: 702026557.

Abstract (AB): Population and clinic-based studies have consistently suggested that a considerable number of individuals with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) report histories of sexual, physical, or emotional abuse. This chapter on the role of sexual or physical abuse in IBS is from a book that provides an up-to-date overview of the care of patients with IBS. IBS is a condition characterized by abdominal pain and an erratic bowel disturbance (diarrhea, constipation, or both) that can interrupt the patient’s life and persist indefinitely. The authors of this chapter review the prevalence and impact of abuse in IBS, along with possible mechanisms linking abuse to IBS. Practical guidelines for the assessment and referral of IBS patients with a history of abuse are also provided. The chapter includes full-color illustrations, a highlighted section of key points, and a list of references. 5 figures. 20 references.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Etiology. Patient Care Management. Symptoms. Etiology. Sexual Abuse. Psychological Factors.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Pathology. Constipation. Diarrhea. Abdominal Pain. Epidemiology. Child Abuse. Diagnostic Tests.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200404.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 09928.

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6. Irritable Bowel Syndrome in Twins: Heredity and Social Learning Both Contribute to Etiology.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): JOURNAL ARTICLE (24).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2001.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Levy, R.L., et al.

Source (SO): Gastroenterology 121(4): 799-804. October 2001.

Availability (AV): Available from W.B. Saunders Company. 6277 Sea Harbor Drive, Orlando, FL 32887-4800. (800) 654-2452. Website: www.gastrojournal.org.

Abstract (AB): The irritable bowel syndrome is a chronic functional gastrointestinal disorder characterized by abdominal discomfort or pain that beings with a change in the frequency or consistency of stool (diarrhea or constipation), that is relieved by defecation, and that is present in the absence of other diseases that could explain the symptoms. Heredity has been suggested to explain the finding that irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) tends to run in families. This article reports on a study undertaken to assess the relative contribution of genetic and environmental (social learning) influences on the development of IBS by comparing concordance rates in monozygotic (identical) and dizygotic (fraternal) twins to concordance between mothers and their children. Questionnaires soliciting information on the occurrence of more than 80 health problems, including IBS, in self and other family members were sent to both members of 11,986 twin pairs. The authors’ analysis is based on 10,699 respondents representing 6,060 twin pairs. Concordance for IBS was significantly greater in monozygotic (17.2 percent) than in dizygotic (8.4 percent) twins, supporting a genetic contribution to IBS. However, the proportion of dizygotic twins with IBS who have mothers with IBS (15.2 percent) was greater than the proportion of dizygotic twins with IBS who have co-twins with IBS (6.7 percent). Logistic regression analysis showed that having a mother with IBS and having a father with IBS are independent predictors of irritable bowel status; both are stronger predictors than having a twin with IBS. Addition of information about the other twin accounted for little additional predictive power. The authors conclude that heredity contributes to development of IBS, but social learning (what an individual learns from those in his or her environment) has an equal or greater influence. 1 figure. 2 tables. 18 references.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Heredity. Etiology. Environmental Factors. Siblings. Research. Twins.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Incidence. Epidemiology. Home Environment. Mothers. Fathers. Risk Factors. Genetics.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200204.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD JA 08701.

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7. Irritable Bowel: A Poorly Understood Disorder.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): JOURNAL ARTICLE (24).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2001.

Audience code (AC): GENERAL PUBLIC (300).

Author (AU): Lewis, C.

Source (SO): FDA Consumer. 35(4): 30-36. July-August 2001.

Availability (AV): Available from Food and Drug Administration (HFI-40). 5600 Fishers Lane, Rockville, MD 20857.

Abstract (AB): This article offers an overview of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), the most common gastrointestinal disorder seen by physicians. IBS presents with abdominal pain, cramps, gas, bloating, diarrhea and constipation as the main symptoms. IBS is a disorder of the intestine that shows no sign of disease (pathology) that can be seen or measured. Second only to the common cold in causing days missed from work, IBS may affect up to 20 percent of Americans. Onset of IBS is usually in late adolescence or early adult life. Although IBS is associated with severe pain and discomfort, the illness does not lead to cancer, life-threatening conditions, or surgery. The author explores how the gastrointestinal system functions independently of the rest of the body (humans can digest their food without thinking), how messages between the brain and gut alert a person to gastrointestinal malfunction, and how conditions such as stress aggravate the IBS symptoms of diarrhea and constipation. The author also discusses a new treatment for IBS, Lotronex (alosetron hydrochloride), which was approved and then subsequently pulled off the market. One sidebar lists resource organizations through which readers can obtain additional information (web sites are also provided). Brief biographies of five patients living with IBS are included. 1 figure.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Symptoms. Diagnosis. Patient Care Management. Quality of Life.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Diarrhea. Constipation. Abdominal Pain. Food Sensitivity. Diet Therapy. Drug Therapy. Psychosocial Factors. Activities of Daily Living. Biography. Pathophysiology.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200204.

Notes (NT): CP: No.

Accession Number (AN): DD JA 08753.

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8. Emotional Abuse and IBS: Study Found Link to Severity but not Causality.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): NEWSLETTER ARTICLE (35).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2001.

Audience code (AC): PATIENT (400).

Author (AU): Drossman, D.A.

Source (SO): Participate. 10(3): 6. Fall 2001.

Availability (AV): Available from International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD). P.O. Box 170864, Milwaukee, WI 53217. (888) 964-2001 or (414) 964-1799. Fax (414) 964-7176. E-mail: iffgd@iffgd.org. Website: www.iffgd.org.

Abstract (AB): This brief newsletter article reports on a recent study that looked at the frequency of emotional abuse (e.g., psychological maltreatment) as well as other psychosocial factors among women diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) or inflammatory bowel disease (IBD, including ulcerative colitis or Crohn’s disease). The authors found that there was a higher frequency of abuse and psychosocial factors in the women with IBS than those with inflammatory bowel disease, and that this did not relate to other emotional factors like depression. The authors of the research stress that their results do not prove any causality. Previous research has found that abuse leads to poorer health and greater health care utilization, and this is true for any gastrointestinal diagnosis. In other words, abuse does not cause these disorders, but if it exists in a woman who also has IBS, it makes the condition worse. This history may lead to a lower pain threshold, or more difficulty coping with the disorder, and therefore an increased need to get help from physicians.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Etiology. Psychosocial Factors. Psychological Factors.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Child Abuse. Sexual Abuse. Delivery of Health Care. Health Beliefs. Gastrointestinal Diseases. Stress. Trauma.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200204.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD JA 08802.

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9. Under the Microscope: Research News Bulletin from the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): JOURNAL ARTICLE (24).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2001.

Audience code (AC): PATIENT (400).

Corporate Author (CN): Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA).

Source (SO): Under the Microscope. Summer 2001. p. 1-6.

Availability (AV): Available from Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA). 386 Park Avenue South, 17th Floor, New York, NY 10016-8804. (800) 932-2423. E-mail: info@ccfa.org. Website: www.ccfa.org. PRICE: Single copy free.

Abstract (AB): This newsletter offers a summary of research news that may be of interest to people with Crohn’s disease or colitis. The articles review current research activities, focusing on those projects supported by the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA). For example, this issue includes a report on a recent breakthrough in the genetic understanding of Crohn’s disease, a report on the Digestive Disease Week conference (the major medical conference of the year for everyone who plays a role in studying and treating inflammatory bowel disease, IBD), and sidebars about current research projects in which readers may wish to participate. The news report from Digestive Disease Week covers clinical trials of IBS medications, including entanercept, infliximab, Budesonide, and natalizumab; adolescents in transition; cancer surveillance in IBD; animal models of IBD; and a burden of disease (economic) study. 2 figures.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Crohns Disease. Ulcerative Colitis. Research. Information Resources. Voluntary Organizations.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Drug Therapy. Drug Effects. Clinical Research. Animal Studies. Adolescents. Cancer. Risk Factors. Costs. Genetics. Conferences.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200207.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD JA 08913.

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10. Challenges in Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): BOOK/MONOGRAPH (32).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2001.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Jewell, D.P.; Warren, B.F.; Mortensen, N.J., eds.

Source (SO): Malden, MA: Blackwell Science, Inc. 2001. 294 p.

Availability (AV): Available from Blackwell Science, Inc. 350 Main Street, Commerce Place, Malden, MA 02148. (800) 215-1000 or (617) 388-8250. Fax (617) 388-8270. E-mail: books@blacksci.com. Website: www.blackwell-science.com. PRICE: $145.95. ISBN: 0632051698.

Abstract (AB): This book offers an approach to the subject of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that highlights current areas of controversy. Divided into six sections, the book covers epidemiology; etiology and pathogenesis; diagnosis and assessment; management; surveillance for colorectal cancer; long-term complications; and prognosis. The 23 chapters cover topics including chances in the incidence of IBS, the differences between familial disease and sporadic disease, the role of genetics, controversies in histopathological diagnosis, diagnostic tools, the use of mesalazine, nutritional therapy, antibiotics in treating Crohn’s disease, immunosuppression and immunomodulation, the surgical management of ulcerative colitis, the causes and treatment of ileoanal pouch dysfunction, the recognition of dysplasia, cancer surveillance in colitis, the case against surveillance for colorectal cancer, growth retardation in children with IBD, osteopenia, and prognosis in IBD. Each chapter includes references and a subject index concludes the text.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Epidemiology. Etiology. Pathogenesis. Diagnosis. Patient Care Management. Colon Cancer. Complications. Prognosis.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Diagnostic Tests. Genetics. Drug Therapy. Medical Nutrition Therapy. Growth. Ulcerative Colitis. Crohns Disease. Immune System. Drug Effects. Surgery. Patient Selection.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200304.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 09369.

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11. Digestive Diseases and Disorders Sourcebook.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): MONOGRAPH/BOOK (32).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2000.

Audience code (AC): GENERAL PUBLIC (300). PATIENT (400).

Author (AU): Bellenir, K., ed.

Source (SO): Detroit, MI: Omnigraphics. 2000. 300 p.

Availability (AV): Available from Omnigraphics, Inc. 615 Griswold, Detroit, MI 48226. (800) 234-1340. Fax (800) 875-1340. PRICE: $48.00 plus shipping and handling. ISBN: 0780803272.

Abstract (AB): This sourcebook provides basic information for the layperson about common disorders of the upper and lower digestive tract. The sourcebook also includes information about medications and recommendations for maintaining a healthy digestive tract. The book’s 40 chapters are arranged in three major parts. The first section, Maintaining a Healthy Digestive Tract, offers basic information about the digestive system and digestive diseases, information about tests and treatments, and recommendations for maintaining a healthy digestive system. The second section, Digestive Diseases and Functional Disorders, describes nearly 40 different diseases and disorders affecting the digestive system. These include appendicitis, bleeding in the digestive tract, celiac disease, colostomy, constipation, constipation in children, Crohn’s disease, cyclic vomiting syndrome, diarrhea, diverticulosis and diverticulitis, gallstones, gas in the digestive tract, heartburn (gastroesophageal reflux disease), hemorrhoids, hernias, Hirschsprung’s disease, ileostomy, indigestion (dyspepsia), intestinal pseudo-obstruction, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), IBS in children, lactose intolerance, Menetrier’s disease, rapid gastric emptying, short bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis, ulcers, Whipple’s disease, and Zollinger Ellison syndrome. The final section offers a glossary of terms, a subject index and a directory of digestive diseases organizations (which includes website and email addresses as available). Material in the book was collected from a wide range of government agencies, nonprofit organizations, and periodicals.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Information Resources. Diagnosis. Therapy. Diagnostic Tests. Digestion. Physiology. Health Promotion.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Gastrointestinal System. Inflammatory Bowel Syndrome. Constipation. Celiac Disease. Colostomy. Gastrointestinal Bleeding. Motility Disorders. Diarrhea. Gallstones. Flatulence. Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Lactose Intolerance. Ulcer. Patient Education. Patient Care Management.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200004.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 07597.

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12. What You Need to Know About Gas in Children.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): JOURNAL ARTICLE (24).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2000.

Audience code (AC): GENERAL PUBLIC (300).

Author (AU): Dorsky, R.

Source (SO): Digestive Health and Nutrition. p. 20. March-April 2000.

Availability (AV): Available from American Gastroenterological Association. 7910 Woodmont Avenue, 7th Floor, Bethesda, MD 20814. (877) DHN-4YOU or (301) 654-2055, ext. 650. E-mail: DHN@gastro.org.

Abstract (AB): This brief article familiarizes readers with the physiology underlying a common occurrence: gas in children. The author stresses that burping and passing gas is usually part of the child’s healthy digestive system. However, when the child has stomach pain that is relieved by making stool, has a change in stool habit, stool hardness, or bloating of the stomach, then he or she may suffer from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). There are some situations that do lead to too much gas in a child. Some of these are nursing with an empty bottle, using a stiff nipple or a nipple with too small an opening, and failure to bring a baby into an upright position to burp after feeding. In older children, using a straw, chewing gum, sucking on candies, drinking too many carbonated drinks, overusing antacids, swallowing large amounts of air, or suddenly increasing dietary fiber can cause gas. The author concludes by reiterating that there is no link between colic and gas. The article is printed in the same issue with a lengthy article on gas problems (flatulence and burping) in adults.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Flatulence. Health Education. Physiology. Diet. Children.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Patient Education. Prevention. Risk Factors. Symptoms. Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Colic.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200007.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD JA 07634.

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13. Everything You Ever Wanted to Ask a Gastroenterologist.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2000.

Audience code (AC): PATIENT (400).

Author (AU): Magee, E.

Source (SO): In: Magee, E. Tell Me What to Eat If I Have Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Franklin Lakes, NJ: Career Press, Inc. 2000. p. 12-23.

Availability (AV): Available from Career Press, Inc. 3 Tice Road, P.O. Box 687, Franklin Lakes, NJ 07417. (800) 227-3371. Website: www.careerpress.com or www.newpagebooks.com. PRICE: $10.99 plus shipping and handling.

Abstract (AB): This chapter is from a book that offers eating and nutrition guidelines for people who have been diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). People with IBS have bowels that tend to overreact in certain situations. Whatever affects the bowels of the population at large, such as diet, hormones, or stress, affects those of people with IBS even more, resulting in the symptoms of the disorder. This introductory chapter answers common questions about IBS (‘everything you ever wanted to ask a gastroenterologist’). IBS is described as a common disorder of the intestines that can lead to crampy abdominal pain, gassiness (flatulence), bloating, changes in bowel habits (diarrhea, constipation, or both), a feeling of incomplete emptying of the bowel, and passing mucus with bowel movements. The symptoms range from mildly annoying (for most patients) to disabling (for a few patients), and tend to fluctuate over time. The author explores the hypotheses for the causes of IBS, including a trigger such as flu or food poisoning, the role of hormones (many women have more IBS symptoms during their menstruation), genetics, childhood constipation and colic, and childhood physical or sexual abuse. There is no standard way of treating IBS and there is no drug available to cure the discomfort of an irritable bowel. There are some medications that can help relieve symptoms in some people. Stress may worse IBS symptoms by stimulating colonic spasm is people with IBS. Three types of psychotherapy may be helpful for IBS patients: brief psychodynamic therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, and hypnosis. The author cautions that some symptoms (gastrointestinal bleeding, fever, weight loss, nocturnal symptoms, fecal incontinence, persistent severe pain) are not part of IBS and may indicate another problem that should be investigated. 2 tables. 1 reference.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Diet Therapy. Nutrition. Symptoms. Self Care. Food Habits. Stress. Etiology.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Risk Factors. Dietary Fiber. Constipation. Diarrhea. Food Sensitivity. Guidelines. Travel. Counseling. Psychosocial Factors. Diagnosis.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200110.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 08539.

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14. Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): VIDEORECORDING, VIDEOCASSETTE TAPES (84). OTHER (AUDIOVISUAL/EQUIPMENT) (86).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2000.

Audience code (AC): PATIENT (400).

Corporate Author (CN): Films for the Humanities and Sciences.

Source (SO): Princton, NJ: Films for the Humanities and Sciences. 2000. (VHS; DVD).

Physical description (PD): VHS (24 min.), col; or DVD (24 min.), col.

Availability (AV): Available from Films for the Humanities and Sciences. PO Box 2053 Princeton, NJ 08543-2053. (800) 257-5126. Fax: (609) 275-3767. Website: www.films.com. PRICE: $129.95 for VHS; $154.95 for DVD; plus shipping and handling. Item number: BVL11999.

Abstract (AB): Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a medical mystery, even though it affects approximately ten percent of adults. Using case studies and medical research, this program seeks to understand chronic overreaction of the bowels, a condition that has its roots in the complex interaction between the brain and the intestinal tract. The program covers symptoms; exacerbators, including stress, hormonal fluctuations, and a history of childhood abuse; and psychosocial factors, such as the stigma of bowel-related disorders.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Symptoms. Etiology. Complications. Psychosocial Factors. Pathophysiology.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Diagnosis. Diagnostic Tests. Constipation. Diarrhea. Abdominal Pain. Etiology. Stress. Hormones.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200401.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD AV 09796.

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15. Childhood Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2000.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Hyman, P.E., et al.

Source (SO): In: Drossman, D.A., et al., eds. Rome II: The Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders. 2nd ed. McLean, VA: Degnon Associates, Inc. 2000. p. 533-575.

Availability (AV): Available from Degnon Associates, Inc. Rome II Management, 6728 Old McLean Village Drive, McLean, VA 22101. Fax: 703-556-8729. Email: giworkingteam@degnon.org. Website: www.romecriteria.org. PRICE: $79.95 plus shipping and handling. ISBN: 965683729.

Abstract (AB): Childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders include a variable combination of often age-dependent, chronic or recurrent symptoms not explained by structural or biochemical abnormalities. Functional symptoms during childhood are sometimes accompaniments to normal development (e.g., infant regurgitation), or they may arise from maladaptive behavioral responses to internal or external stimuli (e.g., functional fecal retention often results from painful defecation or coercive toilet training). This chapter on childhood functional bowel disorders is from a text that reviews the diagnosis, pathophysiology, and treatment of functional gastrointestinal disorders. The chapter covers vomiting, including infant regurgitation, infant rumination syndrome, and cyclic vomiting syndrome; abdominal pain, including functional dyspepsia, irritable bowel syndrome, abdominal migraine, and aerophagia (swallowing excessive amounts of air); functional diarrhea; and disorders of defecation, including infant dyschezia, functional constipation, functional fecal retention, and functional non-retentive fecal soiling. For each condition, the authors discuss definition, epidemiology, diagnostic criteria, clinical evaluation, physiologic features, psychological features, and treatment options. A listing of recommendations for future research concludes each section of the chapter. 1 table. 107 references.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Gastrointestinal Tract. Functional Colonic Disorders. Children. Abdominal Pain. Gastrointestinal Motility. Patient Care Management. Diagnosis. Therapy.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Defecation. Complications. Dyspepsia. Vomiting. Fecal Incontinence. Epidemiology. Symptoms. Physiology. Psychological Factors. Pathology. Risk Factors. Diagnostic Tests. Research Methodology. Quality of Life. Morbidity. Etiology.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200404.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 09950.

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16. Digestive System.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 1999.

Audience code (AC): GENERAL PUBLIC (300). PATIENT (400).

Author (AU): Hagan, P.T., ed.

Corporate Author (CN): Mayo Clinic.

Source (SO): In: Hagan, P.T., ed. Mayo Clinic Guide to Self-Care: Answers for Everyday Health Problems. New York, NY: Kensington Publishers. 1999. p. 56-67.

Availability (AV): Available from Mayo Clinic. 200 First Street, S.W., Rochester, MN 55905. (800) 291-1128 or (507) 284-2511. Fax (507) 284-0161. Website: www.mayo.edu. PRICE: $16.95 plus shipping and handling. ISBN: 0962786578.

Abstract (AB): This chapter on the digestive tract is from a self care handbook on everyday health problems. Published by the Mayo Clinic, this handbook offers readers a guide to symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment (particularly self care strategies and tips for handling these problems in children) for common problems. The chapter begins with a brief overview of the anatomy and physiology of the digestive system. Following are discussions of abdominal pain, colic, constipation, diarrhea, excessive gas and gas pains, gallstones, gastritis (burning or sour stomach), hemorrhoids and rectal bleeding, hernias, indigestion and heartburn, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), nausea and vomiting, and ulcers. Sidebars cover appendicitis, excessive use of laxatives, and a new dual drug treatment for peptic ulcers. The chapter concludes with the address and telephone number for the National Digestive Diseases Information Clearinghouse (NDDIC) for further information. The book is focused on how to prevent illness, how to detect illness before it becomes a serious, costly problem, and how to avoid unnecessary trips to the clinic or emergency room. 7 figures.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Self Care. Symptoms. Diagnosis. Therapy. Prevention.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Abdominal Pain. Appendicitis. Constipation. Diarrhea. Flatulence. Gallstones. Gastritis. Hemorrhoids. Hernia. Dyspepsia. Heartburn. Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Nausea. Vomiting. Ulcer. Laxatives. Drug Therapy. Diagnostic Tests. Diet Therapy. Risk Factors.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 199910.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 07123.

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17. Fiber Therapy in IBS and Other GI Disorders.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): NEWSLETTER ARTICLE (35).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 1999.

Audience code (AC): PATIENT (400).

Author (AU): Anderson, J.W.

Source (SO): Participate. 8(1): 2-4. Spring 1999.

Availability (AV): Available from International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD). P.O. Box 170864, Milwaukee, WI 53217. (888) 964-2001 or (414) 964-1799. Fax (414) 964-7176. E-mail: iffgd@iffgd.org. Website: www.iffgd.org.

Abstract (AB): Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common and most troublesome conditions for which individuals seek medical therapy. This newsletter article offers suggestions for individuals with IBS who wish to use fiber therapy and other dietary adjustments to manage their disease. The author cautions that dietary fiber can be a double edged sword for people with intestinal disorders. While fiber alleviates constipation, certain high fiber foods, such as bran, may increase gas production and bloating. However, it seems likely that most persons with IBS will benefit from at least a moderate increase in dietary fiber intake. The author stresses the need for a gradual increase in dietary fiber, to modify, improve, and (in some people) eliminate the abnormal bowel habits and painful symptoms associated with IBS. Persons who have difficulty obtaining the goal of 20 to 35 grams per day through diet alone may find fiber supplementation helpful. The author notes that dietary fiber also offers advantages for persons at risk for hypertension, diabetes, or obesity. The author reviews the differences between soluble and insoluble dietary fiber, children and dietary fiber, where to find a variety of fiber types, and nutrition therapy (including fiber). The article includes a sidebar on the different types of fiber supplements, and a brief list of practical tips for adding fiber to the diet.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Dietary Fiber. Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Diet Therapy.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Patient Education. Nutrition. Food Habits. Symptoms. Diarrhea. Constipation. Meal Planning.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200011.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD JA 07345.

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18. Antibiotic Use, Childhood Affluence and Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS).

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): JOURNAL ARTICLE (24).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 1998.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Mendall, M.A.; Kumar, D.

Source (SO): European Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 10(1): 59-62. January 1998.

Availability (AV): Available from Rapid Science Publishers. 400 Market Street, Suite 750, Philadelphia, PA 19106. (800) 552-5866.

Abstract (AB): Antibiotics cause well-defined short-lived disturbances in bowel habits. There is evidence to suggest that antibiotics may play a role in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This article reports on a study that consisted of a survey examining the relationship between drug use and other epidemiological correlates of IBS. Subjects were 421 people (46 percent male, mean age 47 years) attending a general practice health screening clinic. Subjects were interviewed by a research nurse and completed a previously validated questionnaire. IBS symptoms were said to be present if abdominal pain with two or more Manning criteria symptoms occurred more than once a month over the previous 6 months. Results showed 48 subjects with symptoms of IBS. The following were strongly related to its presence: antibiotic use, female sex, childhood living density of less than 1 person per room, and a manual occupation for the father. The use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, H2 antagonists, or other types of medication was not greater in this group. The authors conclude that antibiotic use is associated with IBS and call for further research into this association. In addition, privileged childhood living conditions were also an important risk factor consistent with an allergic etiology forIBS. 2 tables. 12 references. (AA).

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Etiology. Antibiotics. Children. Risk Factors.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Drug Effects. Drug Therapy. Socioeconomic Factors. Symptoms. Pain. Diarrhea. Epidemiology.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 199904.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD JA 06742.

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19. When to Suspect Lactose Intolerance: Symptomatic, Ethnic, and Laboratory Clues.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): JOURNAL ARTICLE (24). REVIEW (46).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 1998.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Srinivasan, R.; Minocha, A.

Source (SO): Postgraduate Medicine. 104(3): 109-111, 115-116, 122-123. September 1998.

Abstract (AB): Lactose intolerance is the inability to digest significant amounts of lactose (the sugar found in milk and dairy products). Lactose intolerance affects millions of people worldwide and should be suspected particularly when evaluating gastrointestinal symptoms in ethnic populations in which it is prevalent. The authors of this article discuss symptoms and methods of detection and offer their recommendations for helping patients with this common disorder. Daily ingestion of less than 240 mL of milk is well tolerated by most adults with lactose intolerance. Some persons with normal lactase activity may become symptomatic after consuming products containing lactose. Lactose maldigestion can coexist in adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and in children with recurrent abdominal pain. Management consists primarily of dietary changes. People who avoid dairy products should receive calcium supplementation and should be advised to read ingredient labels carefully. Several lactase replacement products are available, but their efficacy varies. One sidebar discusses hidden sources of lactose, listing common foods that may contain lactose. 4 tables. 21 references. (AA-M).

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Lactose Intolerance. Diagnosis. Patient Care Management.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Lactase Deficiency. Milk. Dietary Calcium. Diet Therapy. Symptoms. Ethnic Groups. Risk Factors. Food Labeling.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 199904.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD JA 06900.

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20. Foods That Harm, Foods That Heal: An A-Z Guide to Safe and Healthy Eating.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): MONOGRAPH/BOOK (32).

Language(s) (LG): EN.

Year Published (YR): 1997.

Audience code (AC): GENERAL PUBLIC (300). PATIENT (400).

Author (AU): Weiss, S.E., ed.

Source (SO): Pleasantville, NY: Reader’s Digest. 1997. 400 p.

Availability (AV): Available from Customer Service, Reader’s Digest. Pleasantville, NY 10570. (800) 846-2100. PRICE: $30.00. ISBN: 0895779129.

Abstract (AB): This nutrition reference book features more than 400 photographs and illustrations with more than 400 A to Z entries on a vast range of foods and health concerns, include caffeine, cancer, diabetes, fast food, garlic, heart disease, influenza, osteoporosis, pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, and vegetarianism. The book is designed to provide families with information to help understand the close links between foods and wellness. Each food entry provides at-a-glance information on its nutrients (or lack of) and its benefits and drawbacks. Each ailment is accompanied by a list of foods and beverages that are considered safe, and what foods or beverages should be cut down or avoided altogether. Personalized case studies help to illustrate various topics. There are special features on eating during different life stages, from infancy to old age, as well as such issues as genetically altered foods, irradiation, pesticides, and pollution. Other topics include how to cook foods to achieve maximum nutritional benefits; which dietary supplements really work; tips on exercising, storing food, and reading food labels; an instructive analysis of the most popular diet regimens; and controversial foods and additives such as eggs, nitrites, bran, cheese, milk, fat, wine, and alcohol. A glossary defines unfamiliar or technical terms; there is also a listing of organizations that can provide further information and resources. Topics specifically related to digestive diseases include allergic reactions to food, anorexia nervosa, antioxidants, appetite loss, basic food groups, carbohydrates, celiac disease, childhood and adolescent nutrition, cholesterol, constipation, convenience foods, Crohn’s disease, diarrhea, dieting and weight control, digestive and malabsorption disorders, diverticulitis, fats, fiber, food poisoning, gastritis, gastroenteritis, gout, hiatal hernia, indigestion and heartburn, intolerance to milk and other foods, irritable bowel syndrome, malnutrition, medicine-food interactions, minerals, obesity, organic and health foods, preparation and storage of food, restaurants and eating out, smoking and diet, sports nutrition, supplements, traveler’s health, ulcers, vitamins, and worms and other parasites.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Health Education. Nutrition. Health Promotion. Food.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Foodborne Illness. Food Labeling. Food Sensitivity. Vitamins. Minerals. Caloric Intake. Obesity. Dietary Fats. Dietary Fiber. Cholesterol. Diet. Eating Disorders. Malnutrition.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 199707.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 05897.

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