BACK

————————————————————————

1. Inflammatory Diseases of the Colon, Rectum, Anus, and Perianal Region.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2003.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Stein, E.

Source (SO): In: Stein, E. Anorectal and Colon Diseases: Textbook and Color Atlas of Proctology. New York, NY: Springer-Verlag. 2003. p. 335-398.

Availability (AV): Available from Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 175 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10010. (800) SPRINGER or (212) 460-1500. Fax (800) 777-4643 or (201) 348-4505. E-mail: service@springer-ny.com. Website: www.springer-ny.com. PRICE: $199.00 plus shipping and handling. ISBN: 3540430393.

Abstract (AB): This chapter on inflammatory diseases of the colon, rectum, anus, and perianal region is from a multidisciplinary reference book and atlas that covers all aspects of anorectal and colon disease (proctology). Topics include Crohn disease, ulcerative colitis, ischemic (lack of blood flow) colitis, collagenous colitis, pseudomembranous colitis, irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), colitis cystica profunda, solitary rectal ulcer, diverticulosis and diverticulitis, and radiation proctitis. In each section, the author considers etiology, clinical features, diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis. The chapter includes full-color and black-and-white illustrations and photographs, to support the heavily-visual aspects of proctology. Each section concludes with a list of references. 42 figures. 12 tables. 444 references.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Colorectal Diseases. Patient Care Management. Diagnosis. Symptoms. Colon. Inflammation. Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Rectum. Anus. Diagnostic Tests.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Crohns Disease. Ulcerative Colitis. Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Ulcer. Diverticulitis. Diverticulosis. Proctitis. Radiation Colitis. Complications. Surgical Techniques. Surgery. Prognosis. Collagenous Colitis.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200307.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 09508.

————————————————————————

2. Clinical Features, Course, and Laboratory Findings in Ulcerative Colitis.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2003.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Legnani, P.; Kornbluth, A.

Source (SO): In: Lichtenstein, G.R. The Clinician’s Guide to Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Thorofare, NJ: SLACK Incorporated. 2003. p. 27-39.

Availability (AV): Available from SLACK Incorporated. 6900 Grove Road, Thorofare, NJ 08086-9447. (856) 848-1000. Fax (856) 853-5991. Website: www.slackbooks.com. PRICE: $44.95; plus shipping and handling. ISBN: 556425546. Order number: 75546.

Abstract (AB): Although the term inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) describes a wide range of inflammatory states, it generally refers to ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn’s disease. This chapter is from a handbook that presents an up to date guide on selected topics in IBD, focusing on those clinically important areas that have undergone recent changes or discoveries. In this chapter, the authors discuss the clinical features, course, and laboratory findings in ulcerative colitis (UC). Written in an outline format for ease of access, the chapter covers an assessment of disease severity, classification systems, ulcerative proctitis, and ulcerative colitis. Each of the latter two sections covers symptoms, physical examination, laboratory features, and expected clinical course. The section on UC also considers extraintestinal manifestations. 4 tables. 19 references.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Diagnosis. Symptoms. Ulcerative Colitis.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Classification. Morbidity. Complications. Extraintestinal Manifestations. Anemia. Fecal Incontinence. Recurrence. Remission.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200401.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 09833.

————————————————————————

3. Gastroenterology.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): BOOK/MONOGRAPH (32).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2003.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Corporate Author (CN): PDxMD.

Series (SE): [PDxMD Medical Condition Series].

Source (SO): St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Science. 2003. 623 p.

Availability (AV): Available from Elsevier Science. Customer Service Department, 11830 Westline Industrial Drive, St. Louis, MO 63146. (800) 545-2522. Fax (800) 535-9935. Email: usbkinfo@elsevier.com. Website: www.elsevierhealth.com. PRICE: $39.95. ISBN: 932141049.

Abstract (AB): This book on gastroenterology is from a series that provides the latest on evaluation, diagnosis, management, outcomes and prevention. The book offers concise, action-oriented recommendations for primary care medicine. It includes MediFiles (sections) on acute appendicitis, Budd-Chiari syndrome, celiac disease, cholecystitis, cirrhosis, Crohn’s disease, diverticular disease, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in adults, hemorrhoids, alcoholic hepatitis, viral hepatitis, femoral and inguinal hernia, irritable bowel syndrome, lactose intolerance, Mallory-Weiss syndrome, pancreatitis, peptic ulcer, acute peritonitis, proctitis, pseudomembranous colitis, pyloric stenosis, rectal malignancy, and ulcerative colitis. Each MediFile covers summary information and background on the condition, and comprehensive information on diagnosis, treatment, outcomes, and prevention. Each section concludes with a list of resources.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Symptoms. Diagnosis. Therapy. Patient Care Management. Prevention. Guidelines. Diagnostic Tests. Risk Factors. Delivery of Health Care.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Appendicitis. Celiac Disease. Cholecystitis. Cirrhosis. Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Diverticulosis. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. Hemorrhoids. Human Viral Hepatitis. Hernia. Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Lactose Intolerance. Pancreatitis. Ulcer. Stenosis.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200404.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 10045.

————————————————————————

4. Proctitis.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2003.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Corporate Author (CN): PDxMD.

Series (SE): [PDxMD Medical Condition Series].

Source (SO): In: PDxMD. PDxMD Gastroenterology. St. Louis, MO: Elsevier Science. 2003. p. 489-508.

Availability (AV): Available from Elsevier Science. Customer Service Department, 11830 Westline Industrial Drive, St. Louis, MO 63146. (800) 545-2522. Fax (800) 535-9935. Email: usbkinfo@elsevier.com. Website: www.elsevierhealth.com. PRICE: $39.95. ISBN: 932141049.

Abstract (AB): Proctitis is a relatively common condition characterized by bleeding and mucus from the rectum. Proctitis may be associated with ulcerative colitis or due to a sexually transmitted pathogen (Neisseria gonnorrhoea, herpes simplex virus). This chapter on proctitis is from a book on gastroenterology that offers concise, action-oriented recommendations for primary care medicine. The chapter covers summary information and background on the condition, and comprehensive information on diagnosis, treatment, outcomes, and prevention. Specific topics covered include the ICD9 code, urgent action, synonyms, cardinal features, causes (etiology), epidemiology, differential diagnosis, signs and symptoms, associated disorders, investigation of the patient, appropriate referrals and consultations, diagnostic considerations, clinical tips, treatment options, patient management issues, drug therapies, prognosis, complications, and how to prevent recurrence. The information is provided in outline and bulleted format for ease of accessibility. The final section of the chapter offers resources, including related associations, key references, and the answers to frequently asked questions (FAQs). 10 references.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Symptoms. Diagnosis. Therapy. Patient Care Management. Prevention. Guidelines. Proctitis.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Diagnostic Tests. Risk Factors. Delivery of Health Care. Prognosis. Complications. Prevention. Morbidity. Mortality. Anorectal Disorders. Epidemiology. Etiology.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200404.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 10064.

————————————————————————

5. Anal Pain.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2002.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Fleshman, J.W.

Source (SO): In: Edmundowicz, S.A., ed. 20 Common Problems in Gastroenterology. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, Inc. 2002. p. 203-216.

Availability (AV): Available from McGraw-Hill, Inc. 1221 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10020. (612) 832-7869. Website: www.bookstore.mcgraw-hill.com. PRICE: $45.00;plus shipping and handling. ISBN: 0070220557.

Abstract (AB): Anorectal pain is the most common reason why patients seek care from colorectal surgeons, and it is also a frequent problem seen in primary care practice. The management of anal pain is dictated by the diagnosis and by other problems that patients may have. In young healthy individuals with anal fissure (the most common cause), treatment may be as simple as raising their fiber intake. This chapter on anal pain is from a book that focuses on the most common gastroenterological problems encountered in a primary practice setting. The chapter is organized to support rapid access to the information necessary to evaluate and treat most patients with this problems. Topics include the prevalence of anorectal pain; principal diagnoses, including anal fissure, thrombosed external hemorrhoids, perianal and perirectal abscess, infectious proctitis, levator syndrome and pelvic floor abnormality, Crohn’s disease, and anal cancer; typical presentation, of each of these disorders and the presence of anal incontinence (involuntary loss of stool or feces); key aspects of the patient history, including pain, bleeding, bowel patterns, associated diseases, and anal incontinence; the physical examination and ancillary tests; treatment options; patient education; common clinical errors; controversies; and emerging concepts, including the use of botulinum toxin for anal fissure. The chapter includes an outline for quick reference, the text itself, a diagnostic and treatment algorithm, and selected references. 1 figure. 1 table. 13 references.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Gastroenterology. Anus. Pain. Anorectal Disease. Diagnosis. Diagnostic Tests. Therapy. Patient Care Management. Symptoms. Etiology.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Fecal Incontinence. Fissures. Gastrointestinal Bleeding. Hemorrhoids. Abscess. Proctalgia Fugax. Cancer. Crohns Disease. Pelvic Floor. Drug Therapy. Dietary Fiber. Constipation. Prevention.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200208.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 08770.

————————————————————————

6. Vascular Diseases: Hemorrhage, Mesenteric Occlusive and Nonocclusive Disease, Ischemia, Radiation Enteritis, and Volvulus.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2002.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Corman, M.L.; Allison, S.I.; Kuehne, J.P.

Source (SO): In: Corman, M.L.; Allison, S.I.; Kuehne, J.P. Handbook of Colon and Rectal Surgery. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. 2002. p.681-700.

Availability (AV): Available from Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. P.O. Box 1600, Hagerstown, MD 21741. (800) 638-3030 or (301) 223-2300. Fax (301) 223-2365. PRICE: $79.00 plus shipping and handling. ISBN: 0781725860.

Abstract (AB): This chapter on vascular diseases is from a handbook that addresses the entire range of diseases affecting the colon, rectum, and anus. The authors focus on hemorrhage, mesenteric occlusive and nonocclusive disease, ischemia, radiation enteritis, radiation proctitis, and volvulus. For each condition, the authors consider etiology (cause), symptoms, diagnostic strategies, medical management (including drug therapy), and surgical treatments. 2 figures.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Colorectal Diseases. Diagnosis. Therapy. Surgery. Anus. Rectum. Hemorrhage. Ischemia. Radiation Therapy. Complications. Volvulus.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Surgical Techniques. Guidelines. Diagnostic Tests. Symptoms. Physiology. Anatomy. Risk Factors. Patient Care Management. Postoperative Complications. Drug Therapy. Cardiovascular Diseases. Gastroenteritis. Proctitis.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200301.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 09244.

————————————————————————

7. Long-Term Aminosalicylate Therapy is Under-used in Patients With Ulcerative Colitis: A Cross-Sectional Survey.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): JOURNAL ARTICLE (24). REVIEW (46).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2002.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Rubin, C., et al.

Source (SO): Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 16(11): 1889-1893. November 2002.

Availability (AV): Available from Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. Blackwell Science Ltd., Osney Mead, Oxford OX2 OEL, UK. +44(0)1865 206206. Fax +44(0)1865 721205. E-mail: journals.cs@blacksci.co.uk. Website: www.blackwell-science.com.

Abstract (AB): There is evidence from case-control studies that aminosalicylates drugs can reduce colorectal cancer risk by 75 to 81 percent in patients with ulcerative colitis. Patients may fail to comply with long-term therapies, however, or may have been advised to discontinue treatment once in remission. This article reports on a study undertaken to describe the usage of long-term aminosalicylates therapy in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC). The cross-sectional study was performed using data extracted from general practitioner clinical records on demographic features, extent and duration of disease, use of aminosalicylates therapy, and specialist care. The study included 363 people who had UC and no history of colorectal surgery. Ninety-five of 175 patients (54 percent) with proctitis, 78 of 123 patients (63 percent) with left-sided colitis, and 28 of 45 patients (62 percent) with extensive colitis were currently taking an aminosalicylate drug. Those doing so were more likely to be under specialist care than to be definitely or possibly discharged. The likelihood of current aminosalicylates therapy was not related to gender or the extent of disease, but was negatively related to the duration of disease. The authors conclude that a substantial minority of patients with ulcerative colitis does not take long-term aminosalicylates therapy. Those who do are more likely to be under specialist care, to be older, or to have disease of shorter duration. 2 tables. 23 references.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Ulcerative Colitis. Drug Therapy. Aminosalicylates. Patient Selection. Patient Care Management.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Drug Effects. Sex Factors. Age Factors. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases. Administration and Dosage. Colitis. Colon Cancer. Prevention. Risk Factors. Chronic Disease.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200304.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD JA 09333.

————————————————————————

8. Proctitis and Sexually Transmissible Intestinal Disease.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2002.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Fried, R.; Surawicz, C.

Source (SO): In: Feldman, M.; Friedman, L.S.; Sleisenger, M.H. Sleisenger and Fordtran’s Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology/Diagnosis/Management. 7th ed. [2-volume set]. St. Louis, MO: Saunders. 2002. p. 2263-2275.

Availability (AV): Available from Elsevier. 11830 Westline Industrial Drive, St. Louis, MO 63146. (800) 545-2522. Fax (800) 568-5136. Website: www.us.elsevierhealth.com. PRICE: $229.00 plus shipping and handling. ISBN: 0721689736.

Abstract (AB): Sexually transmissible diseases (STDs) include viral, bacterial, protozoal, and helminthic infections. This chapter on proctitis and sexually transmissible intestinal disease is from a comprehensive and authoritative textbook that covers disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, biliary tree, pancreas, and liver, as well as the related topics of nutrition and peritoneal disorders. Topics include clinical syndromes, such as proctitis and perianal disease, human papillomavirus, warts, and anal cancer, proctocolitis, enteritis, and hepatic (liver) and biliary tract diseases; diagnostic considerations, including patient history, physical examination and endoscopy, rectal swab, histology, and serology; and specific diseases, including bacterial infections, viral infections, parasitic infections, anorectal lesions and proctocolitis in HIV-infected patients, enteritis syndromes in HIV-infected patients, and noninfectious proctitis. The chapter includes a mini-outline with page citations, illustrations, and extensive references. 11 figures. 3 tables. 63 references.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Gastroenterology. Pathophysiology. Diagnosis. Patient Care Management. Physiology. Symptoms. Sexually Transmitted Diseases. Proctitis. Anus.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Diagnostic Tests. Professional Education. Pathology. Etiology. Epidemiology. Prognosis. Complications. Viral Infections. Bacterial Infections. Parasitic Infections. Lesions. Anorectal Disease. HIV.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200310.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 09653.

————————————————————————

9. Ulcerative Colitis: A Rational Approach to Management.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): JOURNAL ARTICLE (24). REVIEW (46).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2001.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Picco, M.F.

Source (SO): Consultant. 41(4): 541-548. April 1, 2001.

Availability (AV): Available from Cliggott Publishing Company. 330 Boston Post Road, Darien, CT 06820-4027. (203) 661-0600.

Abstract (AB): Ulcerative colitis (UC), a type of inflammatory bowel disease can manifest as proctitis or proctosigmoiditis, left sided colitoss, or pancolitis. This article offers a rational approach to the management of patients with UC. Frequent low volume bowel movements, urgency, rectal bleeding, and tenesmus (ineffective spasms of the rectum) alone suggest proctitis. Prostration, fever, tachycardia (racing heartbeat), dehydration, and complications of blood loss (which may or may not be accompanied by symptoms of proctitis) suggest more severe disease or more extensive bowel involvement. For patients with mild to moderate disease, mesalamine is recommended to induce and maintain remission. Systemic corticosteroids can induce remission in patients with moderate to severe disease but are not useful for maintenance therapy. Azathioprine or 6 mercaptopurine can be used to wean patients with moderate to severe colitis from corticosteroids and to maintain remission. If severe colitis does not respond to corticosteroids, immunosuppressive therapy or colectomy may be needed. Other indications for surgery include development of acute complications related to disease activity and chronic complications, such as dysplasia, carcinoma, recurrent hemorrhage, or growth retardation in children. Annual surveillance colonoscopy with biopsy is recommended for patients with pancolitis and left sided colitis.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Ulcerative Colitis. Patient Care Management. Classification. Drug Therapy. Surgery. Patient Selection.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Drug Effects. Surgical Techniques. Mesalazine. Aminosalicylates. Immunosuppressive Agents. Colectomy. Complications. Diagnosis. Symptoms.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200107.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD JA 08265.

————————————————————————

10. Management of Distal Colitis.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2001.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Campieri, M.

Source (SO): In: Bayless, T.M. and Hanauer, S.B. Advanced Therapy of Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Hamilton, Ontario: B.C. Decker Inc. 2001. p. 69-71.

Availability (AV): Available from B.C. Decker Inc. 20 Hughson Street South, P.O. Box 620, L.C.D. 1 Hamilton, Ontario L8N 3K7. (905) 522-7017 or (800) 568-7281. Fax (905) 522-7839. Email: info@bcdecker.com. Website: www.bcdecker.com. PRICE: $129.00 plus shipping and handling. ISBN: 1550091220.

Abstract (AB): This chapter on the management of distal colitis is from the second edition of a book devoted to the details of medical, surgical, and supportive management of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), together known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Distal colitis is defined as UC limited to the distal 30 to 50 cm of the large intestine (involving the rectum, sigmoid, and descending colon) and not extending beyond the splenic flexure. Distal colitis is the most common clinical scenario of UC, accounting for 60 to 70 percent of outpatients. From the management perspective, and also due to other physiologic and prognostic features, it is best to separate distal colitis from proctitis, in which the inflammatory process is confined to the rectum. Proctitis often demonstrates more extensive mucosal inflammation, both macroscopic and histologic, compared to more extensive disease (disease in longer parts of the intestines) and thus may require a more prolonged therapeutic approach. Topical treatment is the initial therapy of choice for patients with distal colitis. Enemas are most effective for disease proximal to the rectum, whereas suppositories are both effective and well tolerated in the setting of proctitis. There remains significant controversy and differences of approach regarding dosing, available formulations, and duration of topical versus oral therapy in different parts of the globe. 12 references.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Ulcerative Colitis. Symptoms. Diagnosis. Drug Therapy. Patient Care Management.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Administration and Dosage. Drug Effects. Colon. Intestines. Patient Selection. Complications. Aminosalicylates. Steroids. Topical Administration.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200201.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 08561.

————————————————————————

11. Topically Active Corticosteroids for Colitis.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2001.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Greenberg, G.R.

Source (SO): In: Bayless, T.M. and Hanauer, S.B. Advanced Therapy of Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Hamilton, Ontario: B.C. Decker Inc. 2001. p. 73-76.

Availability (AV): Available from B.C. Decker Inc. 20 Hughson Street South, P.O. Box 620, L.C.D. 1 Hamilton, Ontario L8N 3K7. (905) 522-7017 or (800) 568-7281. Fax (905) 522-7839. Email: info@bcdecker.com. Website: www.bcdecker.com. PRICE: $129.00 plus shipping and handling. ISBN: 1550091220.

Abstract (AB): This chapter on the use of topically active corticosteroids for treating colitis is from the second edition of a book devoted to the details of medical, surgical, and supportive management of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), together known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). UC universally involves the rectum, but the proximal extent (how far it goes) of the disease is variable. When inflammation is limited to the rectum (proctitis) or to the sigmoid colon (proctosigmoiditis), the symptoms of urgency, tenesmus (straining to defecate), and bleeding cause substantial impact on daily activities, but systemic complications are lower when compared to panulcerative colitis. Topical administration of corticosteroids has been a mainstay of primary therapy for distal ulcerative colitis over several decades and also is a useful adjunct to oral therapy for more extensive disease. However, conventional corticosteroids may be associated with a spectrum of undesirable side effects and thus newer steroid formulations have emerged that provide advantages over conventional steroid preparations. The composite clinical experience indicates that topical 5-ASA (aminosalicylates) preparations will usually provide greater efficacy for distal ulcerative colitis. However, in the patient who is refractory to 5-ASA therapy or shows true 5-ASA sensitivity, topical hydrocortisone foam or budesonide may prove to be useful. Further refinements of the colonic release systems for oral budesonide enterocapsules (taken orally, but the drug is not released from the capsule until it reaches the intestine or colon) may be of benefit to patients with more extensive ulcerative colitis. 11 references.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Ulcerative Colitis. Symptoms. Diagnosis. Drug Therapy. Patient Care Management.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Administration and Dosage. Drug Effects. Colon. Intestines. Patient Selection. Complications. Aminosalicylates. Steroids. Topical Administration.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200201.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 08562.

————————————————————————

12. Perianal Disease.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2001.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Pikarsky, A.J.; Wexner, S.D.

Source (SO): In: Bayless, T.M. and Hanauer, S.B. Advanced Therapy of Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Hamilton, Ontario: B.C. Decker Inc. 2001. p. 501-507.

Availability (AV): Available from B.C. Decker Inc. 20 Hughson Street South, P.O. Box 620, L.C.D. 1 Hamilton, Ontario L8N 3K7. (905) 522-7017 or (800) 568-7281. Fax (905) 522-7839. Email: info@bcdecker.com. Website: www.bcdecker.com. PRICE: $129.00 plus shipping and handling. ISBN: 1550091220.

Abstract (AB): This chapter on perianal disease is from the second edition of a book devoted to the details of medical, surgical, and supportive management of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), together known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The reported incidence of perianal involvement in patients with Crohn’s disease ranges from 18 to 94 percent. This variation is a consequence of case selection and differences in criteria used to define anal lesions. The incidence increases with more distal CD, involving over 80 percent of patients with Crohn’s proctitis. Anorectal lesions occur as the only manifestation of Crohn’s disease in 5 to 10 percent of patients. Anorectal lesions in the setting of IBD may be the only way to differentiate between CD and Ulcerative Colitis (UC). In general, any atypical lesion should be regarded as resulting from CD and not Ulcerative Colitis (UC). Multiple lesions, painless lesions, eccentric lesions, and wounds that fail to heal after surgical intervention all are features that raise the possibility of CD. It is particularly critical to distinguish between mucosal Ulcerative Colitis (UC) and CD if the patient is being considered for a colectomy (surgery to remove part or all of the colon) for colonic IBD. The surgical strategy for treating perianal CD depends on the chronicity of the problem, the presence of suppuration, the condition of the rectum, and the status of any small bowel disease. Conservative interventions include stool softeners, psyllium bulking agents, topical steroids, antidiarrheal agents, steroid and 5 ASA suppositories, with or without enemas, and warm sitz baths. The authors stress that the aim of management of perianal CD may not necessarily be to eradicate the condition but rather to preserve the anus with an acceptable level of function. The authors discuss treatment of specific conditions, including fissures (clefts), abscesses (pockets of infection), fistulae (abnormal passageways), rectovaginal fistulae, fecal incontinence (involuntary loss of stool), anorectal strictures (narrowing), and hemorrhoids. A patient care management algorithm is provided in the chapter. 3 figures. 10 references.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Crohns Disease. Patient Care Management. Complications. Anus. Rectum.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Pathology. Symptoms. Risk Factors. Drug Therapy. Constipation. Prevention. Steroids. Drug Effects. Fecal Incontinence. Fistula. Abscess. Fistula. Stricture. Hemorrhoids. Patient Selection. Surgery.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200201.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 08650.

————————————————————————

13. How Can We Predict Prognosis in Inflammatory Bowel Disease?.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2001.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Burak, K.W.; Sutherland, L.R.

Source (SO): Jewell, D.P.; Warren, B.F.; Mortensen, N.J., eds. Challenges in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Malden, MA: Blackwell Science, Inc. 2001. p.269-284.

Availability (AV): Available from Blackwell Science, Inc. 350 Main Street, Commerce Place, Malden, MA 02148. (800) 215-1000 or (617) 388-8250. Fax (617) 388-8270. E-mail: books@blacksci.com. Website: www.blackwell-science.com. PRICE: $145.95. ISBN: 0632051698.

Abstract (AB): Patients who have recently been diagnosed with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) will have many questions for their physicians regarding the clinical course and prognosis of their disease. This chapter on prognosis is from a book that offers an approach to the subject of IBD that highlights current areas of controversy. The authors review the literature concerning the clinical course of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease and how physicians can predict prognosis. Topics include prognosis following the first attack of ulcerative colitis, risk for relapse, the need for colectomy, the risk of progression of proctitis and proctosigmoiditis to more extensive disease, relapse of specific Crohn’s disease patterns, the need for surgery, the role of smoking, and the role of oral contraceptives. 3 tables. 95 references.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Chronic Disease. Ulcerative Colitis. Crohns Disease. Patient Care Management. Prognosis.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Patient Selection. Delivery of Health Care. Remission. Recurrence. Risk Factors. Complications. Prevention. Colectomy. Surgery.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200304.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 09398.

————————————————————————

14. Gastrointestinal and Liver Infections.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2001.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Farthing, M.J.G.

Source (SO): In: Farthing, M.J.G.; Ballinger, A.B., eds. Drug Therapy for Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases. Florence, KY: Martin Dunitz. 2001. p. 107-141.

Availability (AV): Available from Martin Dunitz. Fulfillment Center, Taylor and Francis, 7625 Empire Drive, Florence, KY 41042. (800) 634-7064. E-mail: cserve@routledge_ny.com. Website: www.dunitz.co.uk. PRICE: $75.00 plus shipping and handling. ISBN: 1853177334.

Abstract (AB): Infections of the gastrointestinal tract and liver are the most common disorders of the alimentary tract in both the industrialized and in the resource-poor countries of the world. This chapter on gastrointestinal and liver infections is from a textbook that reviews the drug therapy for gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Diarrhea is the most common manifestation of gastrointestinal infection, but there are many other important clinical syndromes, including esophagitis, gastritis, intestinal obstruction, and proctitis and perianal disease. Bacterial and parasitic infections of the liver and biliary tract are also a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, producing liver abscess, cholangitis, and biliary obstruction, and chronic liver disease with portal hypertension. This chapter provides a brief summary of the pathophysiology of the diseases, the rationale for drug intervention, and appropriate treatment regimens as indicated by current knowledge. The chapter concludes with a drug list that summarizes mode of action, and other aspects of clinical pharmacology where appropriate, drug doses, common adverse affects, and drug interactions. 1 figure. 11 tables. 128 references.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Infectious Diseases. Infection. Gastrointestinal Diseases. Liver Diseases. Etiology. Pathophysiology. Drug Therapy. Drug Effects. Patient Care Management.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Patient Selection. Administration and Dosage. Drugs. Complications. Diarrhea. Symptoms. Diagnosis.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200304.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 09438.

————————————————————————

15. Diagnosing Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2000.

Audience code (AC): PATIENT (400).

Author (AU): Zonderman, J.; Vender, R.S.

Source (SO): In: Zonderman, J. and Vender, R.S. Understanding Crohn Disease and Ulcerative Colitis. Jackson, MS: University Press of Mississippi. 2000. p. 3-22.

Availability (AV): Available from University Press of Mississippi. 3825 Ridgewood Road, Jackson, MS 39211-6492. (601) 432-6205. Fax (601) 432-6217. E-mail: syates@ihl.state.ms.us. PRICE: $28.00 plus shipping and handling. ISBN: 1578062039.

Abstract (AB): Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, together known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), are chronic illnesses of unknown origin. This chapter on diagnosing IBD is from a book that provides timely information about how to obtain and maintain the highest quality of life possible while living with IBD. The authors offer a patient’s perspective on coping with IBD. They caution that the diagnosis of IBD may be made quickly or may take a relatively long time, depending on the symptoms people have when they first visit a doctor because of distress. IBD is most commonly diagnosed in two age groups: young adulthood (ages 15 to 30 years), and middle age (ages 50 to 65 years). Prompt diagnosis and treatment of IBD is important; these are chronic, lifelong conditions that demand medical vigilance. In addition, those in their fifties are entering the age at which colorectal cancer becomes more prevalent; it is important that individuals be evaluated by a physician who can distinguish colitis from cancer. The chapter discusses the three classic symptoms that a doctor considers when assessing whether an individual has IBD: persistent or recurrent diarrhea (with or without rectal bleeding), pain, and fever. The authors review the laboratory tests and other diagnostic procedures that may be used, including sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, barium enema, and upper gastrointestinal (GI) x ray. The authors also describe the nine varieties (subtypes) of IBD: ulcerative proctitis, proctosigmoiditis, left sided colitis, pancolitis, gastroduodenal Crohn disease, jejunoileitis, ileitis, ileocolitis, and granulomatous colitis. 5 figures.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Symptoms. Diagnosis. Patient Care Management.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Patient Education. Risk Factors. Diagnostic Tests. Diarrhea. Pain. Ulcerative Colitis. Crohns Disease. Colonoscopy.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200010.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 07855.

————————————————————————

16. Open Access Follow Up for Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Pragmatic Randomised Trial and Cost Effectiveness Study.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): JOURNAL ARTICLE (24). REVIEW (46).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 2000.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Williams, J.G., et al.

Source (SO): BMJ. 320(7234): 544-548. February 26, 2000.

Availability (AV): Available from BMA House. BMJ Fulfillment Department, Tavistock Square, London WC1H 9TD. 44(0)171 383 6270. E-mail: subscriptions@bmj.com.

Abstract (AB): This article reports on a study undertaken to evaluate whether follow up of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is better through open access than by routine booked appointments. The pragmatic randomized controlled trial took place in two district general hospitals in Swansea and Neath, Wales and included 180 adults (78 with Crohn’s disease, 77 with ulcerative or indeterminate colitis, and 25 ulcerative or idiopathic proctitis). The outcome measures of the study were generic and disease specific quality of life, number of primary and secondary care contacts, total resource use, and views of patients and general practitioners. Results showed no differences in generic or disease specific quality of life. Open access patients had fewer day visits and fewer outpatient visits, but some patients had difficulty obtaining an urgent appointment. There were no significant differences in specific investigations undertaken, inpatient days, general practitioner surgery or home visits, drugs prescribed, or total patient borne costs. Mean total cost in secondary care was lower for open access patients, but when primary care and patient borne costs were added, there were no significant differences in total costs to the National Health Service (NHS) or to society. General practitioners and patients preferred open access. The authors conclude that open access follow up delivers the same quality of care as routine outpatient care and is preferred by patients and general practitioners. Open access uses fewer resources in secondary care but total resource use is similar. Better methods of ensuring urgent access to outpatient clinics are needed. 1 figure. 4 tables. 24 references.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Delivery of Health Care. Cost Benefit Analysis. Administration of Health Care.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Ulcerative Colitis. Crohns Disease. Professional-Patient Relations. Patient Education. Nursing Care. Access to Health Care. Costs. Patient Care Management.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200204.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD JA 08841.

————————————————————————

17. Medical Therapy of Specific Clinical Presentations.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): JOURNAL ARTICLE (24). REVIEW (46).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 1999.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Michetti, P.; Peppercorn, M.A.

Series (SE): (Inflammatory Bowel Disease).

Source (SO): Gastroenterology Clinics of North America. 28(2): 353-370. June 1999.

Availability (AV): Available from W.B. Saunders. 6277 Sea Harbor Drive, Orlando, FL 32887-4800. (800) 654-2452 or (407) 345-4000.

Abstract (AB): A multidisciplinary approach that integrates medical therapy with surgery and other aspects of patient care, such as nutritional and psychosocial support, is essential to the management of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). So contend the authors of this article that describes the use of the available medications in the most common clinical presentations of IBD. Despite new medical therapies, such as 5 aminosalicylic acid compounds, steroids, and immunomodulators, the treatment of patients with IBD remains challenging. Success depends on the appropriate use of the available medications in relation to the severity and localization of the disease. The introduction of novel immunomodulating agents such as antitumor necrosis factor alpha is likely to have a major influence of the current therapeutic strategies. In ulcerative colitis (UC), the inflammation is restricted to the colon and involves only the mucosa and submucosa. The disease typically follows a retrograde gradient in which the most severe lesions are observed in the rectum. Therapy depends on this proximal extension and on the severity of the clinical presentation. Crohn’s disease (CD) is a chronic inflammatory disorder that can affect any segment of the digestive tract. Unlike UC, CD is a transmural disease that can result in various clinical presentations, many of which are amenable to medical therapy. 146 references. (AA-M).

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Inflammatory Bowel Disease. Drug Therapy. Drug Effects. Patient Care Management.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Ulcerative Colitis. Crohn Disease. Animal Studies. Administration and Dosage. Immunosuppressive Agents. Patient Selection. Extraintestinal Complications. Proctitis. Inflammation.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 199910.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD JA 07105.

————————————————————————

18. Unexpected Journey.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): JOURNAL ARTICLE (24).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 1999.

Audience code (AC): PATIENT (400).

Author (AU): Schnippert, A.

Source (SO): Ostomy Quarterly. 36(3): 52-56. Spring 1999.

Availability (AV): Available from Ostomy Quarterly. 36 Executive Park, Suite 120, Irvine, CA 92614-6744. (800) 826-0826 or (714) 660-8624.

Abstract (AB): In this article, from a magazine for people who have an ostomy, the author retells her story of surviving emergency colectomy surgery and adjusting to having an ileostomy. She shares her experiences as she was diagnosed with and treated for ulcerative proctitis, and went through a couple of flareups of the disease, the final one culminating in emergency surgery to remove her colon. Her colon had perforated in three areas, at the bottom, in the middle, and at the top, and was ready to go in numerous other places. The contamination from the perforation put her at risk for total organ shutdown, and she was treated in intensive care for 3 days. She describes the recovery process as the hardest part, as it entailed 6 weeks in the hospital and a long rehabilitation time at home. She also addresses the psychological adjustment to having an ileostomy, focusing on concerns about self image and sexuality. She concludes by discussing her activities with her family, her travel, and her volunteer work as a patient representative for others going through ostomy surgery. 3 figures.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Ostomy. Ileostomy. Case Reports. Psychosocial Factors.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Surgery. Coping. Adjustment. Rehabilitation. Postoperative Care. Patient Advocacy. Activities of Daily Living.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 199910.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD JA 07199.

————————————————————————

19. Limited Colitides: Proctitis, Solitary Rectal Ulcer Syndrome, Colitis Cystica Profunda, Stercoral Ulcers, and Typhlitis.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).

Language(s) (LG): English.

Year Published (YR): 1999.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).

Author (AU): Boynton, R.F.; Maxson, C.J.; Rubin, W.

Source (SO): In: Brandt, L., et al., eds. Clinical Practice of Gastroenterology. Volume One. Philadelphia, PA: Current Medicine. 1999. p. 718-727.

Availability (AV): Available from W.B. Saunders Company. Order Fulfillment, 6277 Sea Harbor Drive, Orlando, FL 32887. (800) 545-2522. Fax (800) 874-6418 or (407) 352-3445. Website: www.wbsaunders.com. PRICE: $235.00 plus shipping and handling. ISBN: 0443065209 (two volume set); 0443065217 (volume 1); 0443065225 (volume 2).

Abstract (AB): This chapter discusses a group of inflammatory, ulcerating diseases limited to a segment of the rectum or colon. These diseases include proctitis, solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS), colitis cystica profunda, stercoral ulcers (decubitus or pressure ulcers of the colon), and typhlitis (necrotizing inflammation of the cecum and ascending colon in patients with profound neutropenia). The chapter is from a lengthy gastroenterology textbook that focuses on issues of patient care. For each condition, the authors discuss epidemiology, etiology and pathogenesis, pathology, clinical features, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, patient care management, and prognosis. The authors note that the severity of these conditions ranges from mild disorders, such as idiopathic ulcerative proctitis, to life threatening diseases, such as typhlitis. Their causes include unknown factors, as with idiopathic ulcerative proctitis; ischemia (lack of blood flow), as with SRUS or localized colitis cystica profunda; pressure necrosis, as with stercoral ulcers; and infection, as with typhlitis. 6 figures. 3 tables. 44 references.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Colon. Rectum. Colorectal Diseases Infection. Inflammation. Patient Care Management. Diagnosis. Symptoms. Therapy.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Professional Education. Drug Therapy. Diagnostic Tests. Risk Factors. Complications. Drug Effects. Prognosis. Proctitis.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 200010.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 07831.

————————————————————————

20. 1998-1999 Complete Directory for People with Rare Disorders.

Subfile: Digestive Diseases

Format (FM): MONOGRAPH/BOOK (32). DIRECTORY (20).

Year Published (YR): 1998.

Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100). PATIENT (400).

Corporate Author (CN): National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD).

Source (SO): Lakeville, CT: Grey House Publishing, Inc. 1998. 726 p.

Availability (AV): Available from Grey House Publishing, Inc. Pocket Knife Square, Lakeville, CT 06039. (860) 435-0868. Fax (860) 435-0867. PRICE: $190.00. ISBN: 0939300982.

Abstract (AB): This directory, from the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) provides a wealth of information on diseases and organizations. The directory offers four sections: disease descriptions, disease specific organizations, umbrella organizations, and government agencies. In the first section, the directory includes descriptions of 1,102 rare diseases in alphabetical order. Each entry defines the disorder, then refers readers to the organizations that might be of interest. Diseases related to digestive diseases include achalasia, Addison’s disease, Alagille syndrome, Barrett’s esophagus, Budd Chiari syndrome, Caroli disease, celiac sprue, cholangitis, cholecystitis, cirrhosis, colitis, Crohn’s disease, Cushing syndrome, cystic fibrosis, diverticulitis, Dubin Johnson syndrome, fructose intolerance, galactosemia, gastritis, gastroesophageal reflux, hepatitis, Hirschprung’s disease, Hurler syndrome, imperforate anus, irritable bowel syndrome, jejunal atresia, Korsakoff’s syndrome, lipodystrophy, maple syrup urine disease, Morquiosyndrome, polyposis, porphyria, proctitis, prune belly syndrome, sarcoidosis, Stevens Johnson syndrome, Tropical sprue, tyrosinemia, valinemia, vitamin E deficiency, Whipple’s disease, Wilson’s disease, and Zollinger Ellison syndrome. Each of the 445 organizations listed in the second section is associated with a specific disease or group of diseases. In addition to contact information, there is a descriptive paragraph about the organization and its primary goals and program activities. Entries include materials published by the organization as well as the diseases the organizations cover, which refer readers to Section I. The third section lists 444 organizations that are more general in nature, serving a wide range of diseases (for example, the American Liver Foundation). The final section describes 74 agencies that are important federal government contacts that serve the diverse needs of individuals with rare disorders. A name and key word index concludes the volume.

Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Organizations. Rare Diseases. Information Resources.

Minor Descriptors (MN): Government Agencies. Patient Education. Health Education. Professional Education. Voluntary Organizations. Research. Diagnosis. Therapy.

Verification/Update Date (VE): 199907.

Notes (NT): CP: Yes.

Accession Number (AN): DD BK 06831.

————————————————————————

href=”proctitis.php”>BACK