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1. Dysmotility of the Small Intestine and Colon.
Subfile: Digestive Diseases
Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).
Language(s) (LG): English.
Year Published (YR): 2003.
Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).
Author (AU): Camilleri, M.
Source (SO): In: Textbook of Gastroenterology. 4th ed. [2-volume set]. Hagerstown, MD: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. 2003. p. 1486-1529.
Availability (AV): Available from Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. P.O. Box 1600, Hagerstown, MD 21741. (800) 638-6423 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting              (800) 638-6423      end_of_the_skype_highlighting. Fax: (301) 223-2400. Website: www.lww.com. PRICE: $289.00. ISBN: 781728614.
Abstract (AB): Dysmotility of the small intestine and colon has a wide range of clinical manifestations, regardless of the underlying cause of the disorder. Patients at one end of the spectrum may be asymptomatic and, at the other, may have chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction, a syndrome characterized by symptoms that suggest obstruction in the absence of structural occlusion of the lumen. Between the two extremes, patients may have dyspeptic symptoms, including intermittent postprandial epigastric or abdominal pain, bloating, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. This chapter on dysmotility of the small intestine and colon is from a lengthy, two-volume textbook that integrates the various demands of science, technology, expanding information, good judgment, and common sense into the diagnosis and management of gastrointestinal patients. In this chapter, the authors focus their initial discussion on the small intestine; motility disorders of the colon are manifested predominantly as constipation and megacolon and are discussed in the latter half of the chapter. Other topics include epidemiology of these dysmotility problems, the neural control of small intestinal and colonic motility, and ontogeny of the enteric nervous system. 32 figures. 10 tables. 449 references.
Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Gastroenterology. Gastrointestinal System. Patient Care Management. Small Intestine. Gastrointestinal Motility. Colon.
Minor Descriptors (MN): Physiology. Epidemiology. Neurophysiology. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction. Symptoms. Motility Disorders. Constipation. Megacolon. Diagnosis. Genetics. Hirschsprung Disease. Systemic Disease. Etiology.
Verification/Update Date (VE): 200401.
Notes (NT): CP: Yes.
Accession Number (AN): DD BK 09782.
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2. Increasing Our Understanding: New Diagnostic Criteria for Pediatric Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders.
Subfile: Digestive Diseases
Format (FM): FACTSHEET (22).
Language(s) (LG): English.
Year Published (YR): 2002.
Audience code (AC): PATIENT (400).
Author (AU): Hyman, P.E.
Source (SO): Milwaukee, WI: International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD). 2002. [2 p.].
Availability (AV): Available from International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD). P.O. Box 170864, Milwaukee, WI 53217-8076. (888) 964-2001 or (414) 964-1799. E-mail: iffgd@iffgd.org. Website: www.iffgd.org. PRICE: $1.00 for nonmembers; single copy free to members.
Abstract (AB): Childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders include a variable combination of often age-dependent chronic or recurrent symptoms that are not explained by anatomic, biochemical, or psychiatric abnormality (disease). Like shivering when leaving a swimming pool, or a runner’s leg cramp, the symptoms are real, but are not due to disease. This fact sheet helps parents understand the diagnostic criteria for pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders. The fact sheet describes the biopsychosocial approach to symptoms, which was introduced in the 1970s. This approach believes that symptoms arise from the simultaneous interaction of complex systems including cells, tissues, organs, as well as interpersonal and social environments. The biopsychosocial clinician focuses on alleviating suffering and returning the patient to function; including, but not limited to, the approach of finding and fixing disease. The fact sheet describes the pediatric Rome Criteria used for the classification and diagnosis of functional disorders such as chronic intestinal Pseudoobstruction and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The fact sheet also describes continuing work on the validation of these criteria and in research areas including better care for children, childhood functional gastrointestinal disorders, and on how childhood disorders may affect the development of adult functional gastrointestinal disorders. One chart lists 13 pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders. The fact sheet includes the contact information for the International Foundation for Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders (IFFGD, www.iffgd.org). 1 figure.
Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Symptoms. Diagnosis. Children. Functional Colonic Disorders. Gastrointestinal System. Classification. Etiology.
Minor Descriptors (MN): Complications. Diagnostic Tests. Behavior. Parent Education. Chronic Disease. Patient Selection. Patient Care Management. Child Development.
Verification/Update Date (VE): 200207.
Notes (NT): CP: Yes.
Accession Number (AN): DD DC 08924.
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3. Mini Guides.
Subfile: Digestive Diseases
Format (FM): JOURNAL ARTICLE (24). REVIEW (46).
Language(s) (LG): English.
Year Published (YR): 2002.
Audience code (AC): PATIENT (400).
Corporate Author (CN): Practical Gastroenterology.
Series (SE): (Guide for Patients).
Source (SO): Practical Gastroenterology. 26(5): 81-84. May 2002.
Availability (AV): Available from Shugar Publishing. 12 Moniebogue Lane, Westhampton Beach, NY 11978. (516) 288-4404. Fax (516) 288-4435.
Abstract (AB): This section of a professional journal of gastroenterology offers mini-guides on some gastroenterological conditions, including intestinal pseudoobstruction, Barrett esophagus, rapid gastric emptying, Hirschsprung disease, short bowel syndrome, NSAID (nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs) and peptic ulcers, and primary biliary cirrhosis. For each condition, the author defines the illness, describes the symptoms, considers the etiology (cause), lists the diagnostic tests used to confirm the condition, and briefly reviews treatment options. When available, the article notes the contact information for any related support group or resource organizations. These guides are designed to be photocopied and distributed to patients by their physicians.
Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Gastrointestinal System. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction. Barrett Esophagus. Gastric Emptying. Hirschsprung Disease. Short Bowel Syndrome. Peptic Ulcer. Primary Biliary Cirrhosis.
Minor Descriptors (MN): Patient Education. Diagnosis. Etiology. Symptoms. Patient Care Management. Drug Therapy. Diagnostic Tests.
Verification/Update Date (VE): 200210.
Notes (NT): CP: Yes.
Accession Number (AN): DD JA 09003.
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4. Disorders of Defecation.
Subfile: Digestive Diseases
Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).
Language(s) (LG): English.
Year Published (YR): 2002.
Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).
Author (AU): Corman, M.L.; Allison, S.I.; Kuehne, J.P.
Source (SO): In: Corman, M.L.; Allison, S.I.; Kuehne, J.P. Handbook of Colon and Rectal Surgery. Philadelphia, PA: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. 2002. p.225-245.
Availability (AV): Available from Lippincott Williams and Wilkins. P.O. Box 1600, Hagerstown, MD 21741. (800) 638-3030 or (301) 223-2300. Fax (301) 223-2365. PRICE: $79.00 plus shipping and handling. ISBN: 0781725860.
Abstract (AB): Chronic idiopathic constipation and abdominal pain are among the most common reasons for patients to solicit medical advice. This chapter addresses a number of conditions associated with bowel evacuation problems, the presenting complaint of which is often constipation. The chapter is from a handbook that addresses the entire range of diseases affecting the colon, rectum, and anus. Topics include physiology of the colon (absorption and propulsion), etiology of chronic constipation, clinical presentations, evaluation of the constipated patient, medical management (diet, exercise, laxatives, enemas, and suppositories), spastic pelvic floor syndrome, obstructed defecation, anismus, Hirschprung’s disease, surgery in the management of constipation, intestinal pseudoobstruction, proctalgia fugax, and coccygodynia. 1 figure. 1 table.
Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Colorectal Diseases. Diagnosis. Therapy. Surgery. Constipation. Defecation. Complications.
Minor Descriptors (MN): Physiology. Surgical Techniques. Guidelines. Diagnostic Tests. Symptoms. Anatomy. Risk Factors. Patient Care Management. Drug Therapy. Hirschprung Disease. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction.
Verification/Update Date (VE): 200301.
Notes (NT): CP: Yes.
Accession Number (AN): DD BK 09239.
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5. Quality of Life Outcomes in Congenital Chronic Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction.
Subfile: Digestive Diseases
Format (FM): JOURNAL ARTICLE (24).
Language(s) (LG): English.
Year Published (YR): 2002.
Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).
Author (AU): Schwankovsky, L., et al.
Source (SO): Digestive Diseases and Sciences. 47(9): 1965-1968. September 2002.
Availability (AV): Available from Kluwer Academic Publishers. Customer Service Department, P.O. Box 358, Accord Station, Hingham, MA 02018-0358. (781) 871-6600. Fax (781) 681-9045. E-mail: kluwer@wkap.com. Website: www.wkap.nl. Distribution Centre, P.O. Box 322, 3300 AH Dordrecht, The Netherlands. 31 78 6392392. Fax: 31 78 6546474. E-mail: orderdept@wkap.nl.
Abstract (AB): This article reports on a study undertaken to assess the quality of life for children with chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIP). The authors used a retrospective chart review to identify children with congenital CIP, the a structured telephone interview with parents that included the Child Health Questionnaire to gather information about the current status and quality of life for each patient and family. Children with CIP had less freedom from pain, depression, and anxiety than healthy children or children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Parents of children with CIP had poorer emotional status than parents of healthy children or children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The time required for parents to care for children with CIP was greater than the time required to care for healthy children or children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The authors conclude that the quality of life for children with CIP lags behind that of healthy children and children with another chronic illness. Appropriate treatment of chronic pain may improve the quality of life for children with CIP and their families. In addition, attention to reducing each family’s burden of time and emotional distress may help them cope better with their chronically ill child. 3 tables. 9 references.
Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Chronic Disease. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction. Children. Quality of Life.
Minor Descriptors (MN): Parenting. Parents. Pain. Patient Care Management. Psychosocial Factors. Caregivers. Depression.
Verification/Update Date (VE): 200301.
Notes (NT): CP: Yes.
Accession Number (AN): DD JA 09282.
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6. Chronic Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction.
Subfile: Digestive Diseases
Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).
Language(s) (LG): English.
Year Published (YR): 2002.
Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).
Author (AU): Schuffler, M.D.
Source (SO): In: Feldman, M.; Friedman, L.S.; Sleisenger, M.H. Sleisenger and Fordtran’s Gastrointestinal and Liver Disease: Pathophysiology/Diagnosis/Management. 7th ed. [2-volume set]. St. Louis, MO: Saunders. 2002. p. 2140-2150.
Availability (AV): Available from Elsevier. 11830 Westline Industrial Drive, St. Louis, MO 63146. (800) 545-2522. Fax (800) 568-5136. Website: www.us.elsevierhealth.com. PRICE: $229.00 plus shipping and handling. ISBN: 0721689736.
Abstract (AB): Chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction is a clinical syndrome caused by ineffective intestinal propulsion and characterized by symptoms and signs of intestinal obstruction in the absence of an occluding lesion of the intestinal lumen. This chapter on chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction is from a comprehensive and authoritative textbook that covers disorders of the gastrointestinal tract, biliary tree, pancreas, and liver, as well as the related topics of nutrition and peritoneal disorders. Topics include causes and pathology, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, radiographic findings, manometric abnormalities, examples of specific syndromes, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. Specific syndromes covered include familial visceral myopathies, familial visceral neuropathies, sporadic visceral neuropathies, developmental disorders of the myenteric plexus, and pseudo-obstruction associated with neurologic disorders. The chapter includes a mini-outline with page citations, illustrations, and extensive references. 9 figures. 3 tables. 50 references.
Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Gastroenterology. Pathophysiology. Diagnosis. Patient Care Management. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction. Physiology. Symptoms.
Minor Descriptors (MN): Functional Colonic Disorders. Diagnostic Tests. Professional Education. Pathology. Etiology. Epidemiology. Prognosis. Manometry. Radiography. Prognosis. Neurophysiology.
Verification/Update Date (VE): 200310.
Notes (NT): CP: Yes.
Accession Number (AN): DD BK 09651.
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7. Pharmacological Treatment of Acute Colonic Pseudo-Obstruction.
Subfile: Digestive Diseases
Format (FM): JOURNAL ARTICLE (24). REVIEW (46).
Language(s) (LG): English.
Year Published (YR): 2001.
Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).
Author (AU): De Giorgio, R., et al.
Source (SO): Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. 15(11): 1717-1727. November 2001.
Availability (AV): Available from Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics. Blackwell Science Ltd., Osney Mead, Oxford OX2 OEL, UK. +44(0)1865 206206. Fax +44(0)1865 721205. E-mail: journals.cs@blacksci.co.uk. Website: www.blackwell-science.com.
Abstract (AB): Acute colonic pseudo-obstruction (Ogilvie’s syndrome) can be defined as a clinical condition with symptoms, signs, and radiological appearance of acute large bowel obstruction unrelated to any mechanical cause. Recent reports of the efficacy of cholinesterase inhibitors in relieving acute colonic pseudo-obstruction have fueled interest in the pharmacological (drug) treatment of this condition. This review article outlines current perspectives in the pharmacological treatment of patients with acute colonic pseudo-obstruction. The best documented drug treatment of Ogilvie’s syndrome is intravenous neostigmine (2 to 2.5 milligrams), which leads to quick decompression in a significant proportion of patients after a single infusion. However, the search for new colokinetic agents for the treatment of lower gut motor disorders has made available a number of drugs that may also be therapeutic options for Ogilvie’s syndrome. Among these agents, the authors discuss the potential of 5 hydroxytryptamine 4 receptor agonists and motilin receptor agonists. 3 figures. 4 tables. 93 references.
Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction. Drug Therapy. Etiology. Drug Effects.
Minor Descriptors (MN): Patient Selection. Functional Colonic Disorders. Motility Disorders. Gastrointestinal Motility.
Verification/Update Date (VE): 200204.
Notes (NT): CP: Yes.
Accession Number (AN): DD JA 08698.
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8. Motility Disorders.
Subfile: Digestive Diseases
Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).
Language(s) (LG): English.
Year Published (YR): 2001.
Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).
Author (AU): Greaves, R.R.S.H.
Source (SO): In: Farthing, M.J.G.; Ballinger, A.B., eds. Drug Therapy for Gastrointestinal and Liver Diseases. Florence, KY: Martin Dunitz. 2001. p. 143-162.
Availability (AV): Available from Martin Dunitz. Fulfillment Center, Taylor and Francis, 7625 Empire Drive, Florence, KY 41042. (800) 634-7064. E-mail: cserve@routledge_ny.com. Website: www.dunitz.co.uk. PRICE: $75.00 plus shipping and handling. ISBN: 1853177334.
Abstract (AB): The motility disorders of the gut represent a heterogeneous group of conditions associated with different parts of the gastrointestinal tract. Although investigative techniques are becoming more sophisticated, the exact relationship between gut dysmotility and gut symptoms is far from clear. In addition, there is a marked overlap, not only between apparently discrete motility conditions but also between these conditions and the normal population. This chapter on motility disorders is from a textbook that reviews the drug therapy for gastrointestinal and liver diseases. Disorders covered include achalasia (swallowing dysfunction), Chagas’ disease, diffuse esophageal spasm, gastroparesis, chronic idiopathic (of unknown cause) intestinal pseudo obstruction, systemic sclerosis, functional constipation, megacolon, postoperative ileus, and sphincter of Oddi dysfunction. The chapter provides a brief summary of the pathophysiology of each disease, the rationale for drug intervention, and appropriate treatment regimens as indicated by current knowledge. The chapter concludes with a drug list that summarizes mode of action, and other aspects of clinical pharmacology where appropriate, drug doses, common adverse affects, and drug interactions. 4 tables. 124 references.
Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Gastrointestinal Diseases. Etiology. Pathophysiology. Drug Therapy. Drug Effects. Patient Care Management. Gastrointestinal Motility. Motility Disorders.
Minor Descriptors (MN): Patient Selection. Administration and Dosage. Drugs. Functional Colonic Disorders. Constipation. Sclerosis. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction. Swallowing Disorders. Esophagus. Gastroparesis. Diagnosis. Postoperative Complications.
Verification/Update Date (VE): 200304.
Notes (NT): CP: Yes.
Accession Number (AN): DD BK 09439.
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9. Nutritional Management of Chronic Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction.
Subfile: Digestive Diseases
Format (FM): JOURNAL ARTICLE (24). REVIEW (46).
Language(s) (LG): English.
Year Published (YR): 1999.
Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).
Author (AU): Scolapio, J.S., et al.
Source (SO): Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology. 28(4): 306-312. June 1999.
Availability (AV): Available from Lippincott-Raven Publishers. P.O. Box 1550, Hagerstown, MD 21741. (800) 638-3030 or (301) 714-2300.
Abstract (AB): Chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIP) is a gastrointestinal motility disturbance characterized by recurrent episodes of postprandial (after a meal) nausea and bloating in the absence of mechanical obstruction of the small bowel or colon. Weight loss and severe malnutrition are often seen in advanced stages of the disorder. This article discusses the nutritional management of patients with CIP, focusing on general dietary as well as enteral and parenteral nutritional support. Management goals are to improve the propulsive function of the intestine and to minimize symptoms while maintaining the patient’s nutritional well being. Enteral access methods and various enteral formulas used in CIP are also discussed. The oral diet in CIP features low fiber, low residue, low lactose or lactose free, and low fat foods and the use of concomitant strategies of eating small meals frequently, sitting upright during meals, and remaining upright for at least 4 hours after a meal. In general, patients with CIP have normal absorptive function of the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, a trial of enteral nutrition should be attempted before parenteral nutrition is begun. Benefits of enteral nutrition compared with parenteral nutrition include cost and preservation of intestinal mucosal function. To determine if a patient is suitable for enteral nutrition, nasojejunal or a combination of nasogastric and nasojejunal feeding tubes should be placed before placement is attempted of the long term enteral tube. In those patients that fail enteral nutrition, home parenteral nutrition (HPN) is a viable treatment with which patients can successfully maintain their weight and lean body mass. 1 figure. 5 tables. 29 references. (AA-M).
Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction. Medical Nutrition Therapy. Patient Care Management. Enteral Nutrition. Parenteral Nutrition.
Minor Descriptors (MN): Motility Disorders. Gastrointestinal Motility. Nasogastric Tubes. Supplemental Feeding. Costs. Patient Selection. Patient Education.
Verification/Update Date (VE): 199910.
Notes (NT): CP: Yes.
Accession Number (AN): DD JA 07154.
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10. Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction.
Subfile: Digestive Diseases
Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).
Language(s) (LG): English.
Year Published (YR): 1999.
Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).
Author (AU): Coulie, B.; Camilleri, M.
Source (SO): In: Coggins, C.H., ed. Annual Review of Medicine: Selected Topics in the Clinical Sciences, Volume 50. Palo Alto, CA: Annual Reviews. 1999. p. 37-55.
Availability (AV): Available from Annual Reviews. 4139 El Camino Way, P.O. Box 10139, Palo Alto, CA 94303-0139. (650) 493-4400. E-mail: science@annurev.org. Website: www.AnnualReviews.org. PRICE: $60.00 plus shipping and handling. ISBN: 0824305507.
Abstract (AB): This review article covers intestinal pseudoobstruction syndromes, a problem that is increasingly recognized in clinical practice. These syndromes result from impairment of intrinsic neuromuscular or extrinsic control of gut motility. Typically, pseudoobstruction syndromes result in features suggesting mechanical obstruction and bowel dilation in the absence of demonstrable obstruction or mucosal disease. The syndrome may affect any region of the gut. Less severe variants without bowel dilation are diagnosed by measurement of gastrointestinal transit and pressure profiles. The aims of treatment are restoration of nutrition and hydration, symptom relief, normalization of intestinal propulsion with prokinetics, and suppression of bacterial overgrowth. Surgery plays a limited role as an adjunct to medical treatment, facilitating enteral nutrition and decompression by means of jejunostomy. Infrequently, resection of localized disease or intestinal transplantation is indicated. The roles of intestinal pacemakers (interstitial cells of Cajal) and genetic mutations in the etiology of pseudoobstruction, as well as the cost benefit ratio of transplantation, will be clarified in the future. 3 figures. 2 tables. 111 references. (AA).
Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction. Diagnosis. Therapy. Nutrition.
Minor Descriptors (MN): Enteral Nutrition. Diagnostic Tests. Gastrointestinal Motility. Motility Disorders. Symptoms. Drug Therapy. Ostomy. Transplantation. Intestines. Surgery.
Verification/Update Date (VE): 200001.
Notes (NT): CP: Yes.
Accession Number (AN): DD BK 07096.
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11. Intestinal Obstruction and Pseudo-Obstruction.
Subfile: Digestive Diseases
Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).
Language(s) (LG): English.
Year Published (YR): 1999.
Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).
Author (AU): Cohen, D.; Manten, H.D.
Source (SO): In: Brandt, L., et al., eds. Clinical Practice of Gastroenterology. Volume One. Philadelphia, PA: Current Medicine. 1999. p. 454-464.
Availability (AV): Available from W.B. Saunders Company. Order Fulfillment, 6277 Sea Harbor Drive, Orlando, FL 32887. (800) 545-2522. Fax (800) 874-6418 or (407) 352-3445. Website: www.wbsaunders.com. PRICE: $235.00 plus shipping and handling. ISBN: 0443065209 (two volume set); 0443065217 (volume 1); 0443065225 (volume 2).
Abstract (AB): This chapter on intestinal obstruction and pseudoobstruction is from a lengthy textbook that brings practitioners up to date on the complexities of gastroenterology practice, focusing on the essentials of patient care. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use may be complicated by uncommon, but potentially severe, gastrointestinal events. Chronic idiopathic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIIP) is a clinical syndrome with the signs and symptoms of an intestinal obstruction but without a mechanical obstruction of the bowel lumen. The signs and symptoms of CIIP can occur at any age and may be indistinguishable from those of organic obstruction. Patients normally present with abdominal distention, pain, nausea and vomiting, and altered bowel habits. Other presentations can include esophageal symptoms and weight loss. Diagnosis is accomplished with laboratory studies, radiographic studies, and manometry (to measure motility); biopsy is rarely necessary for diagnosis. The management of CIIP includes dietary modification, parenteral nutrition, drug therapy, and endoscopic and surgical options. Patients with acute ileus or obstruction present with failure of effective peristalsis. These patients present more acutely than patients with CIIP and have more readily identifiable causes. The most prominent feature of small bowel obstruction is abdominal pain, which is usually diffuse and colicky. Fluid and electrolyte replacement remain the most important first step in the therapy of these patients. Although a significant number of patients get better without surgery, a surgical consultant should monitor these patients in case emergent surgery is needed. 4 figures. 2 tables. 52 references.
Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Gastroenterology. Diagnosis. Patient Care Management. Intestinal Obstruction. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction. Small Intestine. Ileum.
Minor Descriptors (MN): Diagnostic Tests. Pathophysiology. Complications. Epidemiology. Professional Education. Prevention. Surgery. Endoscopy. Diet Therapy. Abdominal Pain. Nausea. Vomiting. Symptoms. Weight Loss.
Verification/Update Date (VE): 200010.
Notes (NT): CP: Yes.
Accession Number (AN): DD BK 07815.
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12. Understanding Pediatric Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction: Implications for Nurses.
Subfile: Digestive Diseases
Format (FM): JOURNAL ARTICLE (24). REVIEW (46).
Language(s) (LG): English.
Year Published (YR): 1998.
Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).
Author (AU): Barr, J.M.B.
Source (SO): Gastroenterology Nursing. 21(1): 11-13. January-February 1998.
Availability (AV): Available from Williams and Wilkins. 351 West Camden Street, Baltimore, MD 21201-2436. (410) 528-8555.
Abstract (AB): Intestinal pseudo-obstruction is actually a group of disorders resulting in bowel dysmotility in the absence of anatomic obstruction. This article reviews the current literature on pediatric intestinal pseudo-obstruction and summarizes information useful to nurses. Because of varied pathologic abnormalities in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract involved in this disorder, pseudo-obstruction has been reported in the literature under different names, including hypoganglionosis, chronic adynamic ileus, pseudo-Hirschsprung’s disease, visceral neuropathy, visceral myopathy, and mego-cystis-microcolon-intestinal hypoperistalsis syndrome. Although a rare condition, its effects are severe, disabling, and life-threatening in pediatric clients. Prognosis is inversely correlated with age and is especially poor in those children with symptoms as newborns. Management involves promoting nutrition adequate for growth, treating symptoms, and preventing complications. Total parenteral nutrition is almost always required, and its long term use is associated with chronic cholestasis and potential hepatic failure. Nurses may encounter pediatric clients with this disorder and their families in many different healthcare arenas, such as in radiology departments, ambulatory care, and acute and home care settings. As with all children with chronic disease or disability, there is concern for normal development. Efforts should be made to stimulate attainment of developmental milestones when caring for infants. Gross and fine motor skills and social and emotional growth should be assessed and fostered in all pediatric clients. 7 references. (AA-M).
Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction. Nursing Care. Children. Infants.
Minor Descriptors (MN): Diagnosis. Patient Care Management. Professional Education. Symptoms. Family. Malnutrition. Motility Disorders. Complications. Prognosis. Parenteral Nutrition.
Verification/Update Date (VE): 199811.
Notes (NT): CP: Yes.
Accession Number (AN): DD JA 06577.
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13. American Pseudo-Obstruction and Hirschsprung’s Disease Society, Inc.: An Introductory Brochure.
Subfile: Digestive Diseases
Format (FM): BROCHURE/PAMPHLET (08).
Language(s) (LG): English.
Year Published (YR): 1997.
Audience code (AC): PATIENT (400).
Corporate Author (CN): American Pseudo-obstruction and Hirschsprung’s Disease Society, Inc. (APHS).
Source (SO): North Andover, MA: American Pseudo-obstruction and Hirschsprung’s Disease Society, Inc. 1997. 4 p.
Availability (AV): Available from APHS. 158 Pleasant Street, North Andover, MA 01845-2797. (978) 685-4477. Fax (978) 685-4488. E-mail: aphs@tiac.net. PRICE: Single copy free.
Abstract (AB): This brochure describes the goals and work of the American Pseudo-obstruction and Hirschsprung’s Disease Society (APHS), an organization formed to answer the needs of families, patients, and health care professionals facing a myriad of challenges posed by gastrointestinal motility disorders in infants and children. As an international, not for profit charitable organization, APHS promotes public awareness of conditions such as chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction syndrome (CIPS), Hirschsprung’s disease (HD), gastroesophageal reflux (GER), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and intestinal neuronal dysplasia (IND), as well as other serious disorders that significantly affect gastrointestinal (GI) motility. The brochure is written in a question and answer format and addresses topics including a definition of GI motility disorders; the rationale for the existence of the organization; and activities of the organization, including conferences and symposia, the APHS newsletter, educational materials, support for biomedical research and research into the management of these disorders, regional APHS support groups, the APHS Parent to Parent Networking Program, the APHS Family Assistance Program (financial assistance), and the Pediatric Community Outreach Program (PCOP). The brochure concludes with a membership application form and a list of the members of the APHS Professional Advisory Board.
Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Voluntary Organizations. Patient Education. Health Education. Motility Disorders.
Minor Descriptors (MN): Gastrointestinal Motility. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction. Hirschsprung Disease. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. Financial Aid. Support Groups.
Verification/Update Date (VE): 199808.
Notes (NT): CP: Yes.
Accession Number (AN): DD BR 06043.
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14. Chronic Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction.
Subfile: Digestive Diseases
Format (FM): FACT SHEET (22).
Language(s) (LG): English.
Year Published (YR): 1997.
Audience code (AC): PATIENT (400).
Corporate Author (CN): American Pseudo-obstruction and Hirschsprung’s Disease Society, Inc. (APHS).
Source (SO): North Andover, MA: American Pseudo-obstruction and Hirschsprung’s Disease Society, Inc. 1997. 2 p.
Availability (AV): Available from APHS. 158 Pleasant Street, North Andover, MA 01845-2797. (508) 685-4477. Fax (508) 685-4488. E-mail: aphs@mail.tiac.net. PRICE: Single copy free.
Abstract (AB): This fact sheet provides basic information about the diagnosis and treatment of chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIP), the name given to a number of rare disorders that cause impaired gastrointestinal (GI) motility (movement in the digestive tract). A diagnosis of CIP is based on symptoms and body changes that occur when the intestine is blocked and surgery is needed. Children with CIP often complain of poor appetite, nausea, vomiting, heartburn, abdominal pain, and constipation. Affected children may not grow or develop at the expected rate. There is no specific test to diagnosis CIP. It is a diagnosis based on symptoms and findings after a physical examination, plus the proven absence of a true bowel obstruction. About 10 percent of affected infants improve spontaneously over months or years. For the remaining 90 percent, there are no cures for the neuromuscular diseases that cause CIP, but there are nutritional, medical, and surgical options to promote normal growth and development. The fact sheet briefly outlines each of these options. The fact sheet concludes that the future for children severely afflicted with CIP is brightened by the evolving promise of intestinal or multiorgan transplantation.
Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Children. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction. Diagnosis. Therapy.
Minor Descriptors (MN): Nutrition. Surgery. Diagnostic Tests. Symptoms. Gastrostomy. Supplemental Feeding. Child Development. Infants.
Verification/Update Date (VE): 199710.
Notes (NT): CP: Yes.
Accession Number (AN): DD DC 06047.
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15. Chronic Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction: A Guide for Parents-Caretakers.
Subfile: Digestive Diseases
Format (FM): BROCHURE/PAMPHLET (08).
Language(s) (LG): English.
Year Published (YR): 1997.
Audience code (AC): PATIENT (400).
Corporate Author (CN): American Pseudo-Obstruction and Hirschsprung’s Disease Society, Inc.
Source (SO): North Andover, MA: American Pseudo-Obstruction and Hirschsprung’s Disease Society, Inc. 1997. 4 p.
Availability (AV): Available from American Pseudo-Obstruction and Hirschsprung’s Disease Society, Inc. 158 Pleasant Street, North Andover, MA 01845. (978) 685-4477. Fax (978) 685-4488. E-mail: aphs@tiac.net. PRICE: Single copy free.
Abstract (AB): This brochure provides basic information for parents and other caregivers of children with chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction (CIP) and other forms of chronic gastrointestinal (GI) motility disorder. GI motility refers to the muscle contractions within the walls of the digestive tract and the movement of food within the digestive system. Written in question and answer format, the brochure addresses the causes of GI motility disorders, the definition and cause of CIP, the incidence and diagnosis of CIP, treatment options, enteral feeding, parenteral feeding, and the impact of CIP on the child’s development and lifespan. In pseudo-obstruction, the symptoms are not caused by a surgically correctable tumor, or twist or ulcer in the bowel, but rather by a problem having to do with the strength or coordination of the contractions that move along contents within the bowel. Children with CIP often complain of poor appetite, nausea, vomiting, heartburn, abdominal pain, and constipation. As a result, normal growth and development may be affected. One treatment option, enteral feedings, consists of predigested liquid diets which may be administered in a variety of ways, including nasogastric tubes, gastrostomy, or jejunostomy. Another option is total parenteral nutrition (TPN), in which a nutritional solution is infused via an intravenous access. The brochure concludes with a brief description of the American Pseudo-obstruction and Hirschsprung’s Disease Society (APHS), a group that offers support and information through parent networking, publications, and educational activities.
Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction. Children. Diagnosis. Symptoms. Therapy. Nutrition. Motility Disorders.
Minor Descriptors (MN): Child Development. Etiology. Parent Education. Support Groups. Gastrostomy. Enteral Nutrition. Parenteral Nutrition. Gastrointestinal Motility.
Verification/Update Date (VE): 199807.
Notes (NT): CP: Yes.
Accession Number (AN): DD BR 06544.
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16. Recommendations of Various Authors Regarding Pediatric Dosing of Cisapride (Propulsid).
Subfile: Digestive Diseases
Format (FM): FACT SHEET (22).
Language(s) (LG): English.
Year Published (YR): 1997.
Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).
Corporate Author (CN): Children’s Motility Disorder Foundation.
Source (SO): Atlanta, GA: Children’s Motility Disorder Foundation. 1997. 2 p.
Availability (AV): Available from Children’s Motility Disorder Foundation. 225 Peachtree Street, NE, Suite 1430, Atlanta, GA 30303. (800) 809-9492 or (404) 529-9200. Fax (404) 529-9202. E-mail: cmdf@motility.org. PRICE: Single copy free.
Abstract (AB): This fact sheet consists of a chart that summarizes the recommendations of various authors regarding pediatric dosing of cisapride (Propulsid). The fact sheet reminds readers that Propulsid is not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for pediatric use. Therefore, a safe and effective pediatric dose has not been established. The chart lists the researchers of each study, the therapeutic area covered, the age of children in the study, and the dosage of cisapride used. Therapeutic areas include reflux (gastroesophageal reflux disease), pseudoobstruction, intractable constipation, cystic fibrosis, reflux associated with bronchopulmonary disease, and excessive regurgitation. Dosages ranged from 0.1 to 0.33 mg per kilogram of body weight, three times per day (t.i.d.). The reverse side of the fact sheet lists the bibliographic references for each of the eleven research studies listed, as well as for two review articles on this topic.
Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Children. Drug Therapy. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. Motility Disorders.
Minor Descriptors (MN): Intestinal Pseudoobstruction. Cystic Fibrosis. Constipation. Drug Effects. Administration and Dosage. Research. Gastrointestinal Motility.
Verification/Update Date (VE): 199807.
Notes (NT): CP: Yes.
Accession Number (AN): DD DC 06504.
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17. Diagnosis and Treatment of Chronic Intestinal Pseudo-Obstruction in Children: Report of Consensus Workshop.
Subfile: Digestive Diseases
Format (FM): REPORT (42).
Language(s) (LG): English.
Year Published (YR): 1997.
Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).
Author (AU): Rudolph, C.D., et al.
Source (SO): Atlanta, GA: Children’s Motility Disorder Foundation. 1997. 37 p.
Availability (AV): Available from Children’s Motility Disorder Foundation. 225 Peachtree Street, NE, Suite 1430, Atlanta, GA 30303. (800) 809-9492 or (404) 529-9200. Fax (404) 529-9202. E-mail: cmdf@motility.org. PRICE: Single copy free.
Abstract (AB): The diagnostic term ‘chronic intestinal pseudo-obstruction’ (CIP) is often used without real regard of its meaning. The resultant inconsistency in the use of the term has hampered the clinical investigation and management of children with disorders of gastrointestinal motility. To address these problems, a Consensus Working Group was convened to arrive at a clear definition of CIP and to suggest an approach for the diagnosis and treatment of CIP; this document is the report of that Working Group. The term pseudo-obstruction denotes signs and symptoms resembling a physical obstruction to luminal flow, but without a true mechanical obstruction. CIP is a rare, severe, disabling disorder characterized by repetitive episodes or continuous symptoms and signs of bowel obstruction, including radiographic documentation of dilated bowel with air-fluid levels, in the absence of a fixed, lumen-occluding lesion. Disorders associated with primary CIP are classified as either myopathy or neuropathy depending on histopathology. Disorders causing secondary CIP are classified according to the presumed underlying pathophysiology, which facilitates an organized approach to evaluation. The document describes diagnostic approaches, including motility testing, screening blood tests, measurement of transit, antroduodenal manometry, electrogastrography, and histology. The document concludes with a brief description of treatment options, including optimal nutrition, treatment of bacterial overgrowth, cisapride, bowel decompression, and small intestine transplant. 2 figures. 2 tables. 174 references.
Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction. Diagnosis. Therapy. Children.
Minor Descriptors (MN): Symptoms. Classification. Etiology. Diagnostic Tests. Drug Therapy. Nutrition. Physiology. Pathology.
Verification/Update Date (VE): 199807.
Notes (NT): CP: Yes.
Accession Number (AN): DD DC 06505.
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18. Critical Evaluation of Prokinetic Drugs.
Subfile: Digestive Diseases
Format (FM): JOURNAL ARTICLE (24). REVIEW (46).
Language(s) (LG): English.
Year Published (YR): 1997.
Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).
Author (AU): Burks, T.F.
Series (SE): (GI Motility Disorders Series, Number 6).
Source (SO): Practical Gastroenterology. 21(9): 18, 20-22, 28-34. September 1997.
Availability (AV): Available from Shugar Publishing, Inc. 99B Main Street, Westhampton Beach, NY 11978. (631) 288-4404. Fax (631) 288-4435. E-Mail: info@practicalgastro.com.
Abstract (AB): Prokinetic drugs, simply defined as those therapeutic agents that enhance gastrointestinal propulsion (movement), are often associated with improved competence of the lower esophageal sphincter or LES (the sphincter between the esophagus and the stomach). This article reviews the mechanisms of action and the therapeutic and adverse effects of the available prokinetic drugs. These agents are of established therapeutic value in some motility disorders of the gastrointestinal tract such as diabetic gastroparesis, and are of potential value for others, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), pseudo-obstruction, and dyspepsia. It has not been convincingly shown that functional bowel disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), respond to prokinetic agents. Specific agents discussed include direct muscarinic agonists, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, metclopramide and domperidone, 5HT4 agonist benzamides, and motilides. 13 figures. 3 tables. (AA-M).
Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Gastrointestinal Motility. Motility Disorders. Drug Therapy. Drug Effects.
Minor Descriptors (MN): Gastroparesis. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction. Dyspepsia. Esophagus. Sphincter. Stomach. Administration and Dosage.
Verification/Update Date (VE): 200008.
Notes (NT): CP: Yes.
Accession Number (AN): DD JA 06526.
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19. Gastric and Small Intestinal Disorders.
Subfile: Digestive Diseases
Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).
Language(s) (LG): English.
Year Published (YR): 1997.
Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).
Author (AU): Stendal, C.
Source (SO): Practical Guide to Gastrointestinal Function Testing. Malden, MA: Blackwell Science, Inc. 1997. p. 69-90.
Availability (AV): Available from Blackwell Science, Inc. Commerce Place, 350 Main Street, Malden , MA 02148-5018. (781) 388-8250. Fax: (781) 388-8255. Website: www.blackwellpublishing.com. PRICE: Contact organization for print copies. ISBN: 632049189.
Abstract (AB): This chapter on gastric (stomach) and small intestinal disorders is from a book that is intended as a practical guide that will enable any gastrointestinal clinic to select the most appropriate tests for any suspected disorder; the book then gives step-by-step directions of how to perform the diagnostic procedure. This chapter is one of four chapters that adopt a problem-solving approach to disorders in each major region of the digestion system: swallowing disorders, reflux disorders, gastric and small intestinal disorders, and colonic and anorectal disorders. In this chapter, the author considers the physiology of the stomach and small intestine, gastroparesis, chronic dyspepsia (heartburn), chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction, sphincter of Oddi dyskinesia, and sphincter of Oddi incompetence. The chapter is illustrated with full color graphics and photographs. 19 figures. 2 tables.
Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Diagnostic Tests. Gastrointestinal System. Diagnosis. Patient Selection. Patient Care Management. Stomach. Small Intestine. Physiology.
Minor Descriptors (MN): Delivery of Health Care. Symptoms. Gastroparesis. Dyspepsia. Chronic Disease. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction. Gastrointestinal Motility. Motility Disorders. Sphincter of Oddi.
Verification/Update Date (VE): 200310.
Notes (NT): CP: Yes.
Accession Number (AN): DD BK 09679.
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20. Pediatric Gastrointestinal Problems.
Subfile: Digestive Diseases
Format (FM): BOOK CHAPTER (09).
Language(s) (LG): English.
Year Published (YR): 1997.
Audience code (AC): HEALTH PROFESSIONALS (100).
Author (AU): Stendal, C.
Source (SO): Practical Guide to Gastrointestinal Function Testing. Malden, MA: Blackwell Science, Inc. 1997. p. 113-125.
Availability (AV): Available from Blackwell Science, Inc. Commerce Place, 350 Main Street, Malden , MA 02148-5018. (781) 388-8250. Fax: (781) 388-8255. Website: www.blackwellpublishing.com. PRICE: Contact organization for print copies. ISBN: 632049189.
Abstract (AB): This chapter on pediatric gastrointestinal problems is from a book that is intended as a practical guide that will enable any gastrointestinal clinic to select the most appropriate tests for any suspected disorder; the book then gives step-by-step directions of how to perform the diagnostic procedure. In this chapter, the author considers gastroesophageal reflux, respiratory problems, esophageal motility disorders, pseudoobstruction, constipation, Hirschsprung disease, megacolon and megarectum, and fecal incontinence. For each condition the author discusses etiology (cause), symptoms, differential diagnosis, and diagnostic procedures. The chapter is illustrated with full color graphics and photographs. 4 figures.
Major Descriptors (MJ): Digestive System Diseases. Diagnostic Tests. Gastrointestinal System. Diagnosis. Patient Selection. Patient Care Management. Pediatrics. Children. Physiology. Symptoms. Etiology.
Minor Descriptors (MN): Delivery of Health Care. Constipation. Fecal Incontinence. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. Gastrointestinal Motility. Motility Disorders. Intestinal Pseudoobstruction. Hirschsprung Disease. Megacolon. Rectum. Congenital Anomalies.
Verification/Update Date (VE): 200310.
Notes (NT): CP: Yes.
Accession Number (AN): DD BK 09681.
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